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Research Article
Issue Date: January 01, 2007
Published Online: April 25, 2014
Updated: June 13, 2018
Factors Influencing the Use of Energy Conservation Strategies by Persons With Multiple Sclerosis
Author Affiliations
  • Christa Holberg, MS, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, Amy Zier and Associates Incorporated, Chicago, IL; christa@amyzier.com
  • Marcia Finlayson, PhD, OT(C), OTR/L, is Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1919 W. Taylor Street, MC 811, Chicago, IL 60612; marciaf@uic.edu
Article Information
Multiple Sclerosis / Neurologic Conditions / Original Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2007
Factors Influencing the Use of Energy Conservation Strategies by Persons With Multiple Sclerosis
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2007, Vol. 61, 96-107. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.61.1.96
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2007, Vol. 61, 96-107. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.61.1.96
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE. To examine the factors influencing the implementation and continued use of energy conservation strategies among persons with multiple sclerosis.

METHOD. A qualitative research design was used. Eight persons with multiple sclerosis who participated in a 6-week energy conservation educational course delivered by teleconference were interviewed using a semistructured, open-ended format. Participants were asked about their thoughts, feelings, and actions resulting from course participation. They also were engaged in a card-sort activity to promote discussion about using the energy conservation strategies. The data were analyzed thematically.

FINDINGS. Three themes directly addressed and interacted to enhance or hinder the use of energy conservation strategies: (1) experience with the disease, (2) sense of self, and (3) environmental factors. The fourth theme of education emphasized how participation in the educational course and use of the strategies afterward gave participants a new ability to manage their lives with multiple sclerosis.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS. The findings of this study demonstrated that the use of energy conservation strategies is not dependent on a single factor but rather on complex, interrelated contextual factors.