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Research Article
Issue Date: May 01, 2009
Published Online: April 25, 2014
Updated: June 13, 2018
Participation of Students With Physical Disabilities in the School Environment
Author Affiliations
  • Snaefridur Thora Egilson, MSc OT, PhD, is Associate Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, Occupational Therapy Program, University of Akureyri, Akureyri, Iceland; sne@unak.is
  • Rannveig Traustadottir, PhD, is Professor, Center of Disability Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik
Article Information
Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Children and Youth
Research Article   |   May 01, 2009
Participation of Students With Physical Disabilities in the School Environment
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2009, Vol. 63, 264-272. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.63.3.264
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2009, Vol. 63, 264-272. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.63.3.264
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We investigated the factors that facilitate or hinder school participation of students with physical disabilities and explored the interaction of those factors.

METHOD. The study used a mixed-methods design that used qualitative and quantitative data. Qualitative data were gathered on 49 participants: 14 students, 17 parents, and 18 teachers. Data analysis was based on grounded-theory procedures. Quantitative data were gathered on 32 students using the School Function Assessment.

RESULTS. The characteristics of each school setting influenced students’ participation. Some settings presented more challenges than others, particularly those with open spaces and limited structures such as the school playground and field trips. Possibilities of student participation decreased with increasing numbers of risk factors, but the interaction between factors was equally important.

CONCLUSION. To promote school participation of students with disabilities, occupational therapists should consider a confluence of child, environmental, and task factors rather than focusing on individual aspects.