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Research Article
Issue Date: May 01, 2007
Published Online: April 28, 2014
Updated: June 13, 2018
Occupational Therapy Outcomes for Clients With Traumatic Brain Injury and Stroke Using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure
Author Affiliations
  • Shawn Phipps, MS, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapy Clinical Specialist, Department of Occupational Therapy and Recreation Therapy, Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center, 7601 East Imperial Highway, Downey, CA 90242; sphipps@ladhs.org. He also is Clinical Instructor and Lecturer, Department of Occupational Therapy, California State University Dominguez Hills, Carson
  • Pamela Richardson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA; pamrichardson@sbcglobal.net
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Stroke / Traumatic Brain Injury / Canadian Occupational Performance Measure in Practice
Research Article   |   May 01, 2007
Occupational Therapy Outcomes for Clients With Traumatic Brain Injury and Stroke Using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2007, Vol. 61, 328-334. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.61.3.328
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2007, Vol. 61, 328-334. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.61.3.328
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether 155 ethnically diverse clients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and stroke (cerebrovascular accident; CVA) who received occupational therapy services perceived that they reached self-identified goals related to tasks of daily life as measured by the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM).

This study found that a statistically and clinically significant change in self-perceived performance and satisfaction with tasks of daily life occurred at the end of a client-centered occupational therapy program (p < .001). There were no significant differences in performance and satisfaction between the TBI and CVA groups. However, the group with right CVA reported a higher level of satisfaction with performance in daily activities than the group with left CVA (p = .03).

The COPM process can effectively assist clients with neurological impairments in identifying meaningful occupational performance goals. The occupational therapist also can use the COPM to design occupation-based and client-centered intervention programs and measure occupational therapy outcomes.