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Research Article
Issue Date: May 01, 2008
Published Online: April 28, 2014
Updated: June 13, 2018
Interrater Reliability of Sensory Integration and Praxis Tests (SIPT) Score Interpretation
Author Affiliations
  • Asha V. Asher, MA, MEd, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapy Coordinator, Sycamore Community Schools, Cincinnati, OH 45249; ashera@sycamoreschools.org
  • L. Diane Parham, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor and Director, Occupational Therapy Graduate Program, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Susan Knox, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Director Emeritus, Therapy in Action, Tarzana, CA
Article Information
Sensory Integration and Processing / Children and Youth
Research Article   |   May 01, 2008
Interrater Reliability of Sensory Integration and Praxis Tests (SIPT) Score Interpretation
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2008, Vol. 62, 308-319. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.62.3.308
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2008, Vol. 62, 308-319. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.62.3.308
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE. This study examined interrater reliability of score interpretation on the Sensory Integration and Praxis Tests (SIPT).

METHOD. Using SIPT scores of two complex cases, 20 trained participants independently rated each case for presence of sensory integrative dysfunction and for relevance of specific patterns of dysfunction. They also provided comments to justify their ratings.

RESULTS. Agreement on the presence of sensory integrative dysfunction was 70% for Case A and 100% for Case B. Reliability was more variable for dysfunctional pattern ratings, ranging from 50% to 100% agreement for Cases A and B, respectively. Participants consistently appeared to use configural decision-making strategies to guide their ratings.

CONCLUSION. Interrater reliability was moderate to high for interpretation of the presence of sensory integrative dysfunction using SIPT scores. Less agreement was apparent regarding specific patterns of dysfunction. Results suggest that additional clinical information, such as clinical observations and case history, may be needed to make reliable distinctions among dysfunctional patterns.