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Research Article
Issue Date: May 01, 2002
Published Online: May 05, 2014
Updated: June 13, 2018
The Process and Outcomes of a Multimethod Needs Assessment at a Homeless Shelter
Author Affiliations
  • Marcia Finlayson, PhD, OT(C), OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1919 West Taylor Avenue (MC 811), Chicago, Illinois 60304; marciaf@uic.edu
  • Michelle Baker, MOT, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, School System, Weehawken, New Jersey
  • Lisa Rodman, MOT, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, ARC Broward, Sunrise, Florida
  • Georgiana Herzberg, PhD, OTR/L, is Associate Professor, Occupational Therapy Program, Nova Southeastern University, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Article Information
Advocacy / Mental Health / Needs Assessment at a Homeless Shelter
Research Article   |   May 01, 2002
The Process and Outcomes of a Multimethod Needs Assessment at a Homeless Shelter
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2002, Vol. 56, 313-321. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.56.3.313
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2002, Vol. 56, 313-321. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.56.3.313
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Abstract

Many factors contribute to homelessness, including extreme poverty, extended periods of unemployment, shortages of low-income housing, deinstitutionalization, and substance abuse. As a result, the needs of people who are homeless are broad and complex. This needs assessment used literature reviews, review of local documents and reports, participant observation, focus groups, and reflective journals to guide the development of an occupational performance skills program at one homeless shelter in south Florida. Through these methods, the role of occupational therapy was extended beyond direct service to include program and resource development, staff education, advocacy, and staff–resident mediation. The findings of the needs assessment and the actions taken as a result of this work point to the huge potential for occupational therapists and students to work together with staff and residents of homeless shelters.