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Research Article  |   October 1992
Activity Positioning and Ischial Tuberosity Pressure: A Pilot Study
Author Affiliations
  • Christopher A. Park, OTR/L, is an Occupational Therapist, Center for Neuro-Educational Therapies, 89 A Centennial Loop, Eugene, Oregon 97401. At the time of this study, he was a candidate for the master’s degree in occupational therapy at the University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, Washington
Article Information
Research
Research Article   |   October 1992
Activity Positioning and Ischial Tuberosity Pressure: A Pilot Study
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 1992, Vol. 46, 904-909. doi:10.5014/ajot.46.10.904
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 1992, Vol. 46, 904-909. doi:10.5014/ajot.46.10.904
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Abstract

Ipsilateral ischial tuberosity pressure of 12 subjects seated in wheelchairs was measured during reach to an activity positioned on both an upright and a flat plane. Ischial tuberosity pressure during cross-body, forward, and lateral reach was measured with a static pressure measurement device. Differences between flat-plane readings and upright-plane readings were analyzed with a t test; no significant difference was obtained. A repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed significant differences in ischial tuberosity pressure between cross-body, forward, and lateral reach in the flat plane activity. However, no significant difference was found between cross-body, forward, and lateral reach in the upright-plane activity. Results of this study support the theory that forward and lateral positioning of activity can supplement standard techniques for relieving pressure.