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Research Article
Issue Date: July 01, 1991
Published Online: June 03, 2014
Updated: June 13, 2018
Educating Entry-Level Occupational Therapy Students in Gerontology
Author Affiliations
  • Ronald G. Stone, MS, OTR/L, is Associate Professor, Occupational Therapy Department, University of Puget Sound, 1500 North Warner, Tacoma, Washington 98416
  • Krista B. Mertens, OTR/L, is an Occupational Therapist, Western State Hospital, Fort Steilacoom, Washington
Article Information
Geriatrics/Productive Aging / Education of OTs and OTAs / Education
Research Article   |   July 01, 1991
Educating Entry-Level Occupational Therapy Students in Gerontology
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 1991, Vol. 45, 643-650. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.45.7.643
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 1991, Vol. 45, 643-650. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.45.7.643
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Abstract

The need for gerontic occupational therapists is increasing as the number of elders increases. The practice of including gerontologic content in occupational therapy entry-level curricula is relatively new. This article provides a rationale for including gerontologic content in entry-level occupational therapy curricula and presents the results of a brief survey conducted in November 1990 of all accredited and developing entry-level professional occupational therapy programs in the United States. Seventy-one percent of the entry-level programs responded. All of the responding programs included some gerontologic content in their curricula, and 82% of the responding programs indicated that the amount of gerontologic content in the required curriculum had increased in the past 5 years. Other gerontologic elements examined were courses offered and topics included in entry-level curricula, textbooks used, and gerontic fieldwork requirements.