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Research Article  |   June 1985
Time Allocation Patterns of Occupational Therapists in Israel: Implications for Job Satisfaction
Author Affiliations
  • Victor Florian, PhD, is Senior Lecturer and Scientific Consultant, School of Social Work, Michal Sheffer, MEd, OTR, is Research Coordinator, and Dalia Sachs, OTR, was director, School of Occupational Therapy; all at University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, Haifa 31999, Israel
Article Information
Complementary/Alternative Approaches / Mental Health / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Features
Research Article   |   June 1985
Time Allocation Patterns of Occupational Therapists in Israel: Implications for Job Satisfaction
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, June 1985, Vol. 39, 392-396. doi:10.5014/ajot.39.6.392
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, June 1985, Vol. 39, 392-396. doi:10.5014/ajot.39.6.392
Abstract

This study analyzes the time allocation patterns at work of a sample group of Israeli occupational therapists who function in different roles and specialty areas. The sample consisted of 89 female occupational therapists working in the areas of physical impairment, rehabilitation, psychiatry, and pediatrics. Subjects recorded all of their activities during one work week and rated 23 previously identified occupational therapy activities according to perceived levels of importance. The results indicated that, on the whole, occupational therapists in all areas devoted at least two-thirds of their time to treatment-related activities (direct and indirect treatment). The results led us to conclude that the time allocation patterns used may have been conducive to “burnout.” Therefore, to facilitate professional growth, we recommend that priorities be set and followed and also that role definitions be adhered to more strictly.