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Research Article  |   June 1983
Technology in the Education of Multiply-Handicapped Children
Author Affiliations
  • Elaine Trefler, OTR, M.Ed., is Assistant Professor, University of Tennessee Center for the Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Engineering Center, 682 Court, Memphis, Tennessee 38163
  • Jeryl Nickey, CCC-SP, is a speech pathologist, Memphis city schools, 2597 Avery Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee 38112
  • Douglas A. Hobson, P. Eng., is Assistant Professor, University of Tennessee Center for the Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Engineering Center, 682 Court, Memphis, Tennessee 38163
Article Information
Assistive Technology / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Features
Research Article   |   June 1983
Technology in the Education of Multiply-Handicapped Children
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, June 1983, Vol. 37, 381-387. doi:10.5014/ajot.37.6.381
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, June 1983, Vol. 37, 381-387. doi:10.5014/ajot.37.6.381
Abstract

The number of technical aids now available has allowed severely multiply-handicapped children to better participate in their education. Project TEACH (Technical-Educational Aids for Children with Handicaps), a 3-year early childhood demonstration project of the Federal Office of Education, provided ten children with seating systems, mobility aids, feeding devices, and augmentative communication aids. The children’s performance of academic, motor, daily living, and communication skills as they relate to their educational program is reported as well as the model used to deliver technical services in an educational environment.