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Research Article  |   June 1983
Exploring Sensory Integrative Dysfunction in Process Schizophrenia
Author Affiliations
  • Anne B. Blakeney, MSOT, OTR, is Assistant Professor, Department of Medical Allied Health Professions, Division of Occupational Therapy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
  • L. Randy Strickland, M.Ed., OTR, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Allied Health and Social Professions, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina, and formerly Director of Occupational Therapy at Dorthea Dix Hospital, Raleigh, North Carolina
  • Jane H. Wilkinson, OTR, is with the Durham City Schools, Durham, North Carolina, and formerly staff occupational therapist at Dorthea Dix Hospital, Raleigh, North Carolina
Article Information
Mental Health / Features
Research Article   |   June 1983
Exploring Sensory Integrative Dysfunction in Process Schizophrenia
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, June 1983, Vol. 37, 399-406. doi:10.5014/ajot.37.6.399
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, June 1983, Vol. 37, 399-406. doi:10.5014/ajot.37.6.399
Abstract

During a 6-week period, the effects of sensory integrative activities on a group of seven chronic nonparanoid schizophrenic adults were compared to the effects of sedentary activities in a control group of seven similar subjects. The effects of each therapeutic approach were evaluated by measuring the patients’ performance in several areas using the Nurses Observation Scale of Inpatient Evaluation30 (NOSIE-30), The Object Manipulation Speed Test, a gait analysis, and grip strength. The results indicated general improvement in the experimental group.

Behaviors measured by the NOSIE-30 showed the most significant improvements. The control group showed isolated improvements in grooming (measured by the NOSIE-30) and in right-hand use (measured by The Object Manipulation Speed Test). These findings suggest that 6 weeks of sensory integrative activities can improve the overall functioning of chronic nonparanoid schizophrenic patients, facilitate their adaptive responses, and enable them to participate more fully in other areas of therapeutic intervention.