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Research Article  |   October 1983
Reliability of the Southern California Postrotary Nystagmus Test with Learning-Disabled Children
Author Affiliations
  • Delmont Morrison, Ph.D., is Research Consultant, CHILD Center, Kentfield, California, and Clinical Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, 94143
  • Jean Sublett, OTR, is Coordinator of Occupational Therapy Services, CHILD Center Study of Sensory Integration Therapy, Kentfield, California 94914, and is Certified, CSSID
Article Information
Learning Disabilities / Neurologic Conditions / Vision / Features
Research Article   |   October 1983
Reliability of the Southern California Postrotary Nystagmus Test with Learning-Disabled Children
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 1983, Vol. 37, 694-698. doi:10.5014/ajot.37.10.694
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 1983, Vol. 37, 694-698. doi:10.5014/ajot.37.10.694
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Abstract

The Southern California Postrotary Nystagmus Test (SCPNT) provides an objective assessment of nystagmus. Although depressed nystagmus duration as measured by the SCPNT is considered a major sign of vestibular dysfunction in learning-disabled children, the reliability of the SCPNT with this population has not been established. To study reliability of nystagmus duration in this population, 89 learning-disabled children were evaluated with the SCPNT. The results demonstrated that this sample had significantly depressed scores and more variability in scores than normal children. Intrascorer and test-retest reliabilities, although statistically significant, were lower than those established with normal children. A test-retest study of the reliability of placing a child in a deviant duration range over time significantly reduced reliability estimates. Clinicians using nystagmus duration scores in the evaluation of vestibular dysfunction in learning-disabled children should be sensitive to the variation in this measure in this population.