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Research Article  |   November 1983
Decreasing Drooling through Techniques to Facilitate Mouth Closure
Author Affiliations
  • Sharon A. Ray, M.S., OTR, at the time of this study, was a graduate student at Sargent College of Allied Health Professions, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215
  • Anita C. Bundy, M.S., OTR, is a clinical instructor of occupational therapy, Sargent College of Allied Health Professions, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215
  • David L. Nelson, Ph.D., OTR, is an assistant professor of occupational therapy, Sargent College of Allied Health Professions, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215
Article Information
Intellectual Disabilities / Neurologic Conditions / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Features
Research Article   |   November 1983
Decreasing Drooling through Techniques to Facilitate Mouth Closure
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November 1983, Vol. 37, 749-753. doi:10.5014/ajot.37.11.749
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November 1983, Vol. 37, 749-753. doi:10.5014/ajot.37.11.749
Abstract

A single case ABA experimental design is presented in which techniques to facilitate mouth closure were hypothesized to decrease drooling. The subject was an 11-year-old male with mental retardation and cerebral palsy. Baseline 1 consisted of 10 half-hour sessions of play, followed by 1-hour periods during which the amount of saliva collected on an absorbent bib was measured and recorded. The subsequent treatment phase of 4 weeks was identical to the baseline except that a half-hour period of intervention was substituted for the half-hour of play. Intervention involved providing jaw control with intermittent tapping and jiggling, stroking the upper gum, and giving juice with jaw control. Baseline 2 consisted of 10 sessions identical to baseline 1. Results indicate that the amount of saliva leaving the mouth was a function of the presence or absence of intervention.