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Research Article  |   September 1983
Activity Group Counseling for Learning-Disabled Children with Behavior Problems
Author Affiliations
  • Elsie McKibbin, M.A., OTR, is Coordinator, Occupational Therapy, University-Affiliated Program, Center for Developmental and Learning Disorders, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama 35294
  • Judy King, OTR, was an occupational therapist, Occupational Therapy, University-Affiliated Program, Center for Developmental and Learning Disorders, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama 35294
Article Information
Learning Disabilities / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Features
Research Article   |   September 1983
Activity Group Counseling for Learning-Disabled Children with Behavior Problems
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September 1983, Vol. 37, 617-623. doi:10.5014/ajot.37.9.617
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September 1983, Vol. 37, 617-623. doi:10.5014/ajot.37.9.617
Abstract

One of the most difficult problems confronting occupational therapists, teachers, and parents in dealing with latency-age learning-disabled children is handling oppositional behavior. Pre-adolescent boys, in particular, frequently have difficulty working cooperatively in a group, relating to peers, staying with a task, and seeing the consequences of their actions.

This paper provides a rationale for treatment of children in groups and describes the development and early results of an activity group approach to counseling learning-disabled children with behavior problems using Gazda’s developmental model. Group members showed improved ability to relate with siblings and peers; more mature and cooperative behavior; greater independence and impulse control; and increased verbal expression of anger. Parent and teacher feedback on behavior changes was positive.