Free
Research Article  |   February 1981
A Survey of Rationales For and Against Hand Splinting in Hemiplegia
Author Affiliations
  • Barbara E. Neuhaus, Ed.D., FAOTA, is Assistant Professor and Project Director, Advanced Graduate Program in Occupational Therapy, Columbia University, New York, New York
  • Eileen R. Ascher, B.S., OTR, is Chief of Occupational Therapy, North Central Bronx Hospital, Bronx, New York
  • Bridget A. Coullon, B.S., OTR, is Occupational Therapist, Nyack Hospital, Nyack, New York
  • Mary V. Donohue, M.A., OTR, is Activities Therapy Coordinator, Out Patient Department, Hillside Division, Long Island Jewish Hillside Medical Center, Glen Oaks, New York
  • Anne Einbond, M.S., OTR, is Staff Therapist at Postgraduate Center for Mental Health, New York, New York
  • Jeanette M. Glover, B.S., OTR, is Independent Living Specialist, Human Resources School, Albertson, New York
  • Susan R. Goldberg, B.S., OTR, is Director, Hand Rehabilitation Center of Westchester, White Plains, New York
  • Valerie L. Takai, B.S., OTR, is Occupational Therapy Consultant, Muscular Dystrophy Association Program, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, New York
Article Information
Splinting / Features
Research Article   |   February 1981
A Survey of Rationales For and Against Hand Splinting in Hemiplegia
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 1981, Vol. 35, 83-90. doi:10.5014/ajot.35.2.83
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 1981, Vol. 35, 83-90. doi:10.5014/ajot.35.2.83
Abstract

This study investigated rationales underlying splinting decisions involving patients with hemiplegia. The survey incorporated a limited-choice, multiple-option questionnaire based on the case study of a man with a left hemiparesis at three hypothetical stages of recovery. Ninety-three occupational therapists who answered indicated whether they would or would not recommend a splint at each stage, and selected one or more reasons for their decisions. The respondents fell into three major categories: those who would 1. never splint, 2. always splint, and 3. splint only in the presence of moderate to severe spasticity. Those with longer clinical experience reflected more tendency to splint. The results indicated conflicting practices in splinting and showed the need for further clinical research in this area.