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Research Article  |   April 1981
Measurement of Ocular Pursuits in Normal Children
Author Affiliations
  • Mary Beth Gilligan, M.S., OTR, is a private practitioner and Adjunct Professor at the University of Denver, Denver, Colorado
  • Wanda Mayberry, M.S., OTR, FAOTA, is an Assistant Professor at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado
  • Linda Stewart, OTR, is staff therapist, Southeastern Metropolitan Board of Cooperative Services, Denver, Colorado
  • Pat Kenyon, OTR, was formerly senior occupational therapist at Bethesda Hospital, Denver, Colorado
  • Chris Gaebler, OTR, was formerly at the Easter Seal Center, Denver, Colorado
Article Information
Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Features
Research Article   |   April 1981
Measurement of Ocular Pursuits in Normal Children
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 1981, Vol. 35, 249-255. doi:10.5014/ajot.35.4.249
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 1981, Vol. 35, 249-255. doi:10.5014/ajot.35.4.249
Abstract

Ocular pursuits have been evaluated by occupational therapists (OTRs) in many settings, but normative information has been lacking. In this study, a standardized method of testing and recording ocular pursuits was developed and pilot tested on both normal and handicapped children. Normative data were then collected by using a cooperative research method in which 28 OTRs in the state of Colorado were trained, in a one-day workshop, to administer and score the test, achieving .98 inter-rater reliability for total test score. Each qualified tester evaluated approximately 15 normal children between 3 and 11 years of age. The total sample was 489 subjects.

There were some age-related trends, and most behaviors demonstrated a ceiling effect, particularly with older children. The results imply that many normal children have some immaturity in ocular pursuit skills until 6 or 7 years of age.