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Research Article  |   August 1981
The Effects of Auditorally Augmented Feedback on the Eye-Hand Coordination of Students with Cerebral Palsy
Author Affiliations
  • Michael L. Talbot, Ed.D., is Assistant Superintendent, Cotting School for Handicapped Children, Boston, Massachusetts
  • John Junkala, Ed.D., is Associate Professor, Boston College, School of Education, Division of Special Education and Rehabilitation, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Features
Research Article   |   August 1981
The Effects of Auditorally Augmented Feedback on the Eye-Hand Coordination of Students with Cerebral Palsy
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 1981, Vol. 35, 525-528. doi:10.5014/ajot.35.8.525
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 1981, Vol. 35, 525-528. doi:10.5014/ajot.35.8.525
Abstract

To explore the question of whether auditorally augmented feedback can improve the eye-hand coordination of individuals with cerebral palsy, 59 (cerebral-palsied) students (mean chronological age 14 years, 3 months) were pretested with the Southern California Motor Accuracy Test and then randomly assigned to three groups. Group 1 performed training exercises—tracing line drawings—while simultaneously receiving auditorally augmented feedback about their efforts. Group 2 performed the same training exercises without the augmented feedback. Group 3 served as controls. All subjects were post-tested with the Southern California Motor Accuracy Test, followed by a second post-test after a 3-month interval. At the first post-test, the performance of the feedback group was significantly superior to that of the other groups. At the second post-test, the performance patterns among the groups were essentially the same as at the time of the first post-test, but between-group differences were no longer significant. The results of this study are discussed in both empirical and theoretical terms.