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Research Article
Issue Date: April 01, 1980
Published Online: July 16, 2014
Updated: June 13, 2018
Sensorimotor versus Cognitive-Perceptual Training Effects on the Body Concept of Preschoolers
Author Affiliations
  • Rex E. Culp, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor, Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado
  • Vicki Nilsen Packard, M.S., is Diagnostic Team Evaluator, Preschool Prevention Program, Children’s Psychiatric Center, Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Ruth Humphry, M.S., OTR, is Chief of Occupational Therapy, The Nisonger Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
Article Information
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Research Article   |   April 01, 1980
Sensorimotor versus Cognitive-Perceptual Training Effects on the Body Concept of Preschoolers
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 1980, Vol. 34, 259-262. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.34.4.259
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 1980, Vol. 34, 259-262. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.34.4.259
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Abstract

The effects of two training programs on the body concept development of preschoolers as reflected in human figure drawings were investigated in this study. Twenty-four three-, four-, and five-year-old preschool children were divided into two experimental groups and one control group, matched closely by age and sex. All subjects were pre-tested with the Goodenough-Harris Drawing Test and post-tested with the same instrument after a one-month intervention training period. Group A received ten hours of sensorimotor training and Group B received ten hours of verbal body-part identification training. The mean gain scores of the two experimental groups were significantly different, with a greater mean gain by the sensorimotor group. Implications for occupational therapy are discussed.