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Research Article
Issue Date: September 01, 2014
Published Online: October 23, 2014
Updated: January 01, 2019
Occupational Therapy Education Research Agenda
Article Information
Education of OTs and OTAs / Multidisciplinary Practice / Research Agenda
Research Article   |   September 01, 2014
Occupational Therapy Education Research Agenda
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2014, Vol. 68, S83-S86. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2014.685S06
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2014, Vol. 68, S83-S86. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2014.685S06
The Occupational Therapy Education Research Agenda identifies six major research goals and priorities for occupational therapy education. It is intended to complement the Occupational Therapy Research Agenda (American Occupational Therapy Associationi, 2011), which identifies five research priorities of the profession as a whole: (1) assessment/measurement, (2) intervention research, (3) basic research, (4) translational research, and (5) health services research.
The education research agenda itself is organized into six categories to drive research activity: (1) theory building, (2) pedagogy, (3) instructional methods, (4) learner characteristics and competencies, (5) socialization to the profession, and (6) faculty development and resources. The Appendix lists the research priorities and sample research questions that exemplify the type of research activity that is pertinent for the Occupational Therapy Education Research Agenda.
Theory building research seeks to develop broad philosophies and theories to support learning to become an occupational therapy practitioner. It conveys the core concepts embedded in occupational therapy educational practice and how these concepts relate to one another, hypothesizes how students learn under specific conditions, and delineates how education theories fit within the context of occupational therapy education. Three goals related to theory building were identified. First, develop profession-specific theories for occupational therapy education. Next, test these theories to determine whether they predict outcomes in various contexts. Finally, engage in research that rigorously defines how educational theories and approaches fit the occupational therapy profession context.
Pedagogy is the coherent conceptual foundation that informs the educator how to facilitate and assess learning and that influences how and why a particular learning context is used (e.g., collaborative learning, competency-based education, experiential learning, problem-based learning, interprofessional education, service learning, situated learning). Five goals are in this category. First, identify occupational therapy’s signature pedagogy or pedagogies. Signature pedagogies “are types of teaching that organize the fundamental ways in which future practitioners are educated for their new profession” (Shulman, 2005, p. 52). Second, evaluate the implementation of the signature pedagogies. Third, test the effectiveness of the signature pedagogies. Fourth, analyze how the signature pedagogies match and are connected to educational theories and approaches. Last, identify and develop an optimum progression of pedagogical practices across the levels of entry to the profession.
Instructional methods are the specific strategies used to promote learning (e.g., tutorials, reflective journaling, cases, concept mapping, technology, simulation, lectures). Two goals are in this category. First, given a particular pedagogy, identify best practices in instructional methods that maximize learning, and second, identify optimal, coherent systems within which instructional methods can achieve entry-level competency in occupational therapy students.
Learner characteristics and competencies focus on features of the learner, including age (adult/young adult learner), abilities, experiential background, and cultural background, and on how these characteristics interact with the acquisition of competency. Five goals were developed in this category. First, identify learner characteristics consistent with success across diverse populations. Second, identify educational program characteristics and practices that effectively support diverse students’ success. Third, identify supports for and barriers to collaborations among national data sources. Fourth, create performance-based tools for measurement of different levels of competency. Last, identify behavioral, social, and professional entry-level competencies.
Socialization to the profession is the process by which students adopt as their own the knowledge, skills, culture, and ethos of occupational therapy—in other words, how students build a professional identity. Three goals were developed. First, identify best educational practices for socialization to the occupational therapy profession. Second, identify the factors that shape professional identity and the development of occupation-centered and evidence-based practice. Third, identify the points of influence for the professional socialization of occupational therapy educators.
Faculty development and resources influence how faculty acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to educate future occupational therapy practitioners and to systematically research occupational therapy education. This goal includes the process and resources by which academic and fieldwork educators develop the knowledge, skills, culture, and ethos of occupational therapy education and academic institutions; the process by which educators maintain their identity as occupational therapy professionals and their commitment to the core ideas of the field; and the processes and resources they need to increase the number of and competencies for occupational therapy practitioners to become educators and researchers of occupational therapy education. Goals in this category were divided into two groups, those focused on effective education and those focused on effective research. Education-focused goals are to identify the faculty resources and programs needed to meet the educational mission and student needs, establish effective methods to prepare faculty to implement best practices in occupational therapy education, and describe and validate a continuum of educator competencies from clinician to master educator. Research-focused goals are to identify trajectories and supports by which educators become researchers, identify processes that support ongoing scholarship in teaching and learning, and pilot education research training programs.
To move occupational therapy education forward, it is important that occupational therapy educators not draw only on education research outside the profession. Although that body of research can contribute to an understanding of how best to educate occupational therapy students, it does not meet all the needs for the profession’s education of its future members (National Research Council, 2012). The Occupational Therapy Education Research Agenda identifies an array of areas in which research needs to be conducted to inform the preparation of future occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants for successful practice.
Appendix.
Occupational Therapy Education Research Agenda
Occupational Therapy Education Research Agenda×
Research CategoriesMajor Research GoalsSample Research Questions
Theory Building
  • Develop profession-specific theories for occupational therapy education and research.

  • Test the theories through research.

  • Rigorously define how education theories and approaches fit the context of the occupational therapy profession (e.g., IPE, PBL, TBL, community-based education, situated learning, adult learning).

  • What is the nature of knowledge in occupational therapy?

  • How is knowledge in occupational therapy organized?

  • What are the core beliefs about knowledge within occupation-centered practices?

  • How do occupational therapy practitioners in occupation-centered practices process knowledge? What is the core logic behind occupation-centered practices?

  • What are the mechanisms by which knowledge in occupational therapy is acquired?

  • How does the knowledge context of occupational therapy modify approaches adopted from the field of education?

Pedagogy
  • Identify a signature pedagogy or pedagogies within occupational therapy.

  • Evaluate the implementation of and outcomes related to occupational therapy’s signature pedagogies.

  • Test the effectiveness of occupational therapy’s signature pedagogies.

  • Analyze the signature pedagogies for their match to educational theories and approaches such as IPE, PBL, TBL, community-based education, and situated learning.

  • Identify and develop an optimum progression of pedagogical practices across the levels of entry into the profession.

  • Is there a signature pedagogy for occupational therapy? If so, what is it, and is it effective in improving performance in practice?

  • How do interprofessional education, PBL, TBL, and other approaches support an occupational therapy signature pedagogy?

  • What constitutes effective pedagogies for occupational therapy education? What other pedagogies are linked to improved performance in practice?

Instructional Methods
  • Given a particular pedagogy, identify best practice instructional methods that maximize learning in occupational therapy.

  • Identify optimal, coherent systems within which instructional methods can achieve entry-level practice competency in occupational therapy students (including a framework for instruction, methods and strategies, learning environment, assessment methods, technology, learning and teaching styles, learners, content sequences, time, resources).

  • Given the profession’s developing signature pedagogy, what instructional methods and strategies are a strong fit?

  • Which instructional methods and strategies are effective?

  • What constitutes evidence-based practice in occupational therapy education?

  • What are the most effective instructional processes related to fieldwork education?

  • How do occupational therapy curricula most effectively use technology?

  • How can the learning outcomes of particular occupational therapy instructional methods and strategies be more effectively assessed?

Learner Characteristics and CompetenciesTo create a global, diverse, and effective occupational therapy work force,
  • Identify learner characteristics across diverse populations consistent with success in different levels of occupational therapy education.

  • Identify educational program characteristics and practices that effectively support student success across diverse populations (e.g., classroom, fieldwork, transition to practice).

  • Identify supports for and barriers to collaborations among national data sources that include learner data (e.g., National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy, Fieldwork Performance Evaluation).

  • Create performance-based tools for measurement of different levels of competency (Level I fieldwork, entry-level and advanced competency).

  • Identify the behavioral, social, and professional entry-level competencies expected of the occupational therapy practitioner.

  • What is the trajectory by which students adapt to graduate education?

  • What administrative practices are related to students’ successful academic performances?

  • What are the learner needs associated with successful performance in fieldwork?

  • What is the longitudinal process of competency attainment from student to entry-level to advanced practitioner?

Socialization to the Profession
  • Identify best educational practices for initial socialization to the occupational therapy profession.

  • Identify the factors that shape professional identity and the development of occupation-centered and evidence-based practice.

  • Identify the points of influence for the professional socialization of occupational therapy educators.

  • How do students assume the identity of occupational therapy practitioner?

  • What educational approaches facilitate students’ professional identity as an occupational therapy practitioner?

  • What education approaches facilitate students’ engagement with the larger issues of the occupational therapy profession?

Faculty Development and ResourcesEffective Education
  • Identify the optimal faculty resources and programs needed to meet the educational mission and the needs of students.

  • Establish effective methods to prepare occupational therapy faculty to implement best practices in occupational therapy education.

  • Describe and validate a continuum of educator competencies from clinician to master educator.

Effective Research
  • Identify trajectories and supports by which educators become researchers and choose to study education.

  • Identify processes that support ongoing scholarship in teaching and learning in occupational therapy education.

  • Pilot education research training programs to improve research productivity.

  • What is the longitudinal process of competency attainment from practitioner to educator (e.g., fieldwork educator, academic faculty, and academic fieldwork coordinator)?

  • What constitutes valuing and recognizing educational research?

  • What are the ultimate qualifications and resources needed by fieldwork educators to provide the optimal learning experience for students?

  • What processes are most effective for building capacity in educational research?

  • What constitutes best practice in faculty development?

  • What is the profile of educational researchers in the profession?

  • What are effective ways to socialize clinicians, fieldwork educators, and new doctoral and postdoctoral graduates to be educators?

Table Footer NoteNote. IPE = interprofessional education; PBL = problem-based learning; TBL = team-based learning.
Note. IPE = interprofessional education; PBL = problem-based learning; TBL = team-based learning.×
Appendix.
Occupational Therapy Education Research Agenda
Occupational Therapy Education Research Agenda×
Research CategoriesMajor Research GoalsSample Research Questions
Theory Building
  • Develop profession-specific theories for occupational therapy education and research.

  • Test the theories through research.

  • Rigorously define how education theories and approaches fit the context of the occupational therapy profession (e.g., IPE, PBL, TBL, community-based education, situated learning, adult learning).

  • What is the nature of knowledge in occupational therapy?

  • How is knowledge in occupational therapy organized?

  • What are the core beliefs about knowledge within occupation-centered practices?

  • How do occupational therapy practitioners in occupation-centered practices process knowledge? What is the core logic behind occupation-centered practices?

  • What are the mechanisms by which knowledge in occupational therapy is acquired?

  • How does the knowledge context of occupational therapy modify approaches adopted from the field of education?

Pedagogy
  • Identify a signature pedagogy or pedagogies within occupational therapy.

  • Evaluate the implementation of and outcomes related to occupational therapy’s signature pedagogies.

  • Test the effectiveness of occupational therapy’s signature pedagogies.

  • Analyze the signature pedagogies for their match to educational theories and approaches such as IPE, PBL, TBL, community-based education, and situated learning.

  • Identify and develop an optimum progression of pedagogical practices across the levels of entry into the profession.

  • Is there a signature pedagogy for occupational therapy? If so, what is it, and is it effective in improving performance in practice?

  • How do interprofessional education, PBL, TBL, and other approaches support an occupational therapy signature pedagogy?

  • What constitutes effective pedagogies for occupational therapy education? What other pedagogies are linked to improved performance in practice?

Instructional Methods
  • Given a particular pedagogy, identify best practice instructional methods that maximize learning in occupational therapy.

  • Identify optimal, coherent systems within which instructional methods can achieve entry-level practice competency in occupational therapy students (including a framework for instruction, methods and strategies, learning environment, assessment methods, technology, learning and teaching styles, learners, content sequences, time, resources).

  • Given the profession’s developing signature pedagogy, what instructional methods and strategies are a strong fit?

  • Which instructional methods and strategies are effective?

  • What constitutes evidence-based practice in occupational therapy education?

  • What are the most effective instructional processes related to fieldwork education?

  • How do occupational therapy curricula most effectively use technology?

  • How can the learning outcomes of particular occupational therapy instructional methods and strategies be more effectively assessed?

Learner Characteristics and CompetenciesTo create a global, diverse, and effective occupational therapy work force,
  • Identify learner characteristics across diverse populations consistent with success in different levels of occupational therapy education.

  • Identify educational program characteristics and practices that effectively support student success across diverse populations (e.g., classroom, fieldwork, transition to practice).

  • Identify supports for and barriers to collaborations among national data sources that include learner data (e.g., National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy, Fieldwork Performance Evaluation).

  • Create performance-based tools for measurement of different levels of competency (Level I fieldwork, entry-level and advanced competency).

  • Identify the behavioral, social, and professional entry-level competencies expected of the occupational therapy practitioner.

  • What is the trajectory by which students adapt to graduate education?

  • What administrative practices are related to students’ successful academic performances?

  • What are the learner needs associated with successful performance in fieldwork?

  • What is the longitudinal process of competency attainment from student to entry-level to advanced practitioner?

Socialization to the Profession
  • Identify best educational practices for initial socialization to the occupational therapy profession.

  • Identify the factors that shape professional identity and the development of occupation-centered and evidence-based practice.

  • Identify the points of influence for the professional socialization of occupational therapy educators.

  • How do students assume the identity of occupational therapy practitioner?

  • What educational approaches facilitate students’ professional identity as an occupational therapy practitioner?

  • What education approaches facilitate students’ engagement with the larger issues of the occupational therapy profession?

Faculty Development and ResourcesEffective Education
  • Identify the optimal faculty resources and programs needed to meet the educational mission and the needs of students.

  • Establish effective methods to prepare occupational therapy faculty to implement best practices in occupational therapy education.

  • Describe and validate a continuum of educator competencies from clinician to master educator.

Effective Research
  • Identify trajectories and supports by which educators become researchers and choose to study education.

  • Identify processes that support ongoing scholarship in teaching and learning in occupational therapy education.

  • Pilot education research training programs to improve research productivity.

  • What is the longitudinal process of competency attainment from practitioner to educator (e.g., fieldwork educator, academic faculty, and academic fieldwork coordinator)?

  • What constitutes valuing and recognizing educational research?

  • What are the ultimate qualifications and resources needed by fieldwork educators to provide the optimal learning experience for students?

  • What processes are most effective for building capacity in educational research?

  • What constitutes best practice in faculty development?

  • What is the profile of educational researchers in the profession?

  • What are effective ways to socialize clinicians, fieldwork educators, and new doctoral and postdoctoral graduates to be educators?

Table Footer NoteNote. IPE = interprofessional education; PBL = problem-based learning; TBL = team-based learning.
Note. IPE = interprofessional education; PBL = problem-based learning; TBL = team-based learning.×
×
References
American Occupational Therapy Association (2011). Occupational therapy research agenda. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 65(6 Suppl.), S4–S7. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2011.65S4 [Article]
American Occupational Therapy Association (2011). Occupational therapy research agenda. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 65(6 Suppl.), S4–S7. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2011.65S4 [Article] ×
National Research Council. (2012). Discipline-based education research: Understanding and improving learning in undergraduate science and engineering. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.
National Research Council. (2012). Discipline-based education research: Understanding and improving learning in undergraduate science and engineering. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.×
Shulman, L. (2005). Signature pedagogies in the professions. Daedalus, 134, 52–59. [Article]
Shulman, L. (2005). Signature pedagogies in the professions. Daedalus, 134, 52–59. [Article] ×
Appendix.
Occupational Therapy Education Research Agenda
Occupational Therapy Education Research Agenda×
Research CategoriesMajor Research GoalsSample Research Questions
Theory Building
  • Develop profession-specific theories for occupational therapy education and research.

  • Test the theories through research.

  • Rigorously define how education theories and approaches fit the context of the occupational therapy profession (e.g., IPE, PBL, TBL, community-based education, situated learning, adult learning).

  • What is the nature of knowledge in occupational therapy?

  • How is knowledge in occupational therapy organized?

  • What are the core beliefs about knowledge within occupation-centered practices?

  • How do occupational therapy practitioners in occupation-centered practices process knowledge? What is the core logic behind occupation-centered practices?

  • What are the mechanisms by which knowledge in occupational therapy is acquired?

  • How does the knowledge context of occupational therapy modify approaches adopted from the field of education?

Pedagogy
  • Identify a signature pedagogy or pedagogies within occupational therapy.

  • Evaluate the implementation of and outcomes related to occupational therapy’s signature pedagogies.

  • Test the effectiveness of occupational therapy’s signature pedagogies.

  • Analyze the signature pedagogies for their match to educational theories and approaches such as IPE, PBL, TBL, community-based education, and situated learning.

  • Identify and develop an optimum progression of pedagogical practices across the levels of entry into the profession.

  • Is there a signature pedagogy for occupational therapy? If so, what is it, and is it effective in improving performance in practice?

  • How do interprofessional education, PBL, TBL, and other approaches support an occupational therapy signature pedagogy?

  • What constitutes effective pedagogies for occupational therapy education? What other pedagogies are linked to improved performance in practice?

Instructional Methods
  • Given a particular pedagogy, identify best practice instructional methods that maximize learning in occupational therapy.

  • Identify optimal, coherent systems within which instructional methods can achieve entry-level practice competency in occupational therapy students (including a framework for instruction, methods and strategies, learning environment, assessment methods, technology, learning and teaching styles, learners, content sequences, time, resources).

  • Given the profession’s developing signature pedagogy, what instructional methods and strategies are a strong fit?

  • Which instructional methods and strategies are effective?

  • What constitutes evidence-based practice in occupational therapy education?

  • What are the most effective instructional processes related to fieldwork education?

  • How do occupational therapy curricula most effectively use technology?

  • How can the learning outcomes of particular occupational therapy instructional methods and strategies be more effectively assessed?

Learner Characteristics and CompetenciesTo create a global, diverse, and effective occupational therapy work force,
  • Identify learner characteristics across diverse populations consistent with success in different levels of occupational therapy education.

  • Identify educational program characteristics and practices that effectively support student success across diverse populations (e.g., classroom, fieldwork, transition to practice).

  • Identify supports for and barriers to collaborations among national data sources that include learner data (e.g., National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy, Fieldwork Performance Evaluation).

  • Create performance-based tools for measurement of different levels of competency (Level I fieldwork, entry-level and advanced competency).

  • Identify the behavioral, social, and professional entry-level competencies expected of the occupational therapy practitioner.

  • What is the trajectory by which students adapt to graduate education?

  • What administrative practices are related to students’ successful academic performances?

  • What are the learner needs associated with successful performance in fieldwork?

  • What is the longitudinal process of competency attainment from student to entry-level to advanced practitioner?

Socialization to the Profession
  • Identify best educational practices for initial socialization to the occupational therapy profession.

  • Identify the factors that shape professional identity and the development of occupation-centered and evidence-based practice.

  • Identify the points of influence for the professional socialization of occupational therapy educators.

  • How do students assume the identity of occupational therapy practitioner?

  • What educational approaches facilitate students’ professional identity as an occupational therapy practitioner?

  • What education approaches facilitate students’ engagement with the larger issues of the occupational therapy profession?

Faculty Development and ResourcesEffective Education
  • Identify the optimal faculty resources and programs needed to meet the educational mission and the needs of students.

  • Establish effective methods to prepare occupational therapy faculty to implement best practices in occupational therapy education.

  • Describe and validate a continuum of educator competencies from clinician to master educator.

Effective Research
  • Identify trajectories and supports by which educators become researchers and choose to study education.

  • Identify processes that support ongoing scholarship in teaching and learning in occupational therapy education.

  • Pilot education research training programs to improve research productivity.

  • What is the longitudinal process of competency attainment from practitioner to educator (e.g., fieldwork educator, academic faculty, and academic fieldwork coordinator)?

  • What constitutes valuing and recognizing educational research?

  • What are the ultimate qualifications and resources needed by fieldwork educators to provide the optimal learning experience for students?

  • What processes are most effective for building capacity in educational research?

  • What constitutes best practice in faculty development?

  • What is the profile of educational researchers in the profession?

  • What are effective ways to socialize clinicians, fieldwork educators, and new doctoral and postdoctoral graduates to be educators?

Table Footer NoteNote. IPE = interprofessional education; PBL = problem-based learning; TBL = team-based learning.
Note. IPE = interprofessional education; PBL = problem-based learning; TBL = team-based learning.×
Appendix.
Occupational Therapy Education Research Agenda
Occupational Therapy Education Research Agenda×
Research CategoriesMajor Research GoalsSample Research Questions
Theory Building
  • Develop profession-specific theories for occupational therapy education and research.

  • Test the theories through research.

  • Rigorously define how education theories and approaches fit the context of the occupational therapy profession (e.g., IPE, PBL, TBL, community-based education, situated learning, adult learning).

  • What is the nature of knowledge in occupational therapy?

  • How is knowledge in occupational therapy organized?

  • What are the core beliefs about knowledge within occupation-centered practices?

  • How do occupational therapy practitioners in occupation-centered practices process knowledge? What is the core logic behind occupation-centered practices?

  • What are the mechanisms by which knowledge in occupational therapy is acquired?

  • How does the knowledge context of occupational therapy modify approaches adopted from the field of education?

Pedagogy
  • Identify a signature pedagogy or pedagogies within occupational therapy.

  • Evaluate the implementation of and outcomes related to occupational therapy’s signature pedagogies.

  • Test the effectiveness of occupational therapy’s signature pedagogies.

  • Analyze the signature pedagogies for their match to educational theories and approaches such as IPE, PBL, TBL, community-based education, and situated learning.

  • Identify and develop an optimum progression of pedagogical practices across the levels of entry into the profession.

  • Is there a signature pedagogy for occupational therapy? If so, what is it, and is it effective in improving performance in practice?

  • How do interprofessional education, PBL, TBL, and other approaches support an occupational therapy signature pedagogy?

  • What constitutes effective pedagogies for occupational therapy education? What other pedagogies are linked to improved performance in practice?

Instructional Methods
  • Given a particular pedagogy, identify best practice instructional methods that maximize learning in occupational therapy.

  • Identify optimal, coherent systems within which instructional methods can achieve entry-level practice competency in occupational therapy students (including a framework for instruction, methods and strategies, learning environment, assessment methods, technology, learning and teaching styles, learners, content sequences, time, resources).

  • Given the profession’s developing signature pedagogy, what instructional methods and strategies are a strong fit?

  • Which instructional methods and strategies are effective?

  • What constitutes evidence-based practice in occupational therapy education?

  • What are the most effective instructional processes related to fieldwork education?

  • How do occupational therapy curricula most effectively use technology?

  • How can the learning outcomes of particular occupational therapy instructional methods and strategies be more effectively assessed?

Learner Characteristics and CompetenciesTo create a global, diverse, and effective occupational therapy work force,
  • Identify learner characteristics across diverse populations consistent with success in different levels of occupational therapy education.

  • Identify educational program characteristics and practices that effectively support student success across diverse populations (e.g., classroom, fieldwork, transition to practice).

  • Identify supports for and barriers to collaborations among national data sources that include learner data (e.g., National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy, Fieldwork Performance Evaluation).

  • Create performance-based tools for measurement of different levels of competency (Level I fieldwork, entry-level and advanced competency).

  • Identify the behavioral, social, and professional entry-level competencies expected of the occupational therapy practitioner.

  • What is the trajectory by which students adapt to graduate education?

  • What administrative practices are related to students’ successful academic performances?

  • What are the learner needs associated with successful performance in fieldwork?

  • What is the longitudinal process of competency attainment from student to entry-level to advanced practitioner?

Socialization to the Profession
  • Identify best educational practices for initial socialization to the occupational therapy profession.

  • Identify the factors that shape professional identity and the development of occupation-centered and evidence-based practice.

  • Identify the points of influence for the professional socialization of occupational therapy educators.

  • How do students assume the identity of occupational therapy practitioner?

  • What educational approaches facilitate students’ professional identity as an occupational therapy practitioner?

  • What education approaches facilitate students’ engagement with the larger issues of the occupational therapy profession?

Faculty Development and ResourcesEffective Education
  • Identify the optimal faculty resources and programs needed to meet the educational mission and the needs of students.

  • Establish effective methods to prepare occupational therapy faculty to implement best practices in occupational therapy education.

  • Describe and validate a continuum of educator competencies from clinician to master educator.

Effective Research
  • Identify trajectories and supports by which educators become researchers and choose to study education.

  • Identify processes that support ongoing scholarship in teaching and learning in occupational therapy education.

  • Pilot education research training programs to improve research productivity.

  • What is the longitudinal process of competency attainment from practitioner to educator (e.g., fieldwork educator, academic faculty, and academic fieldwork coordinator)?

  • What constitutes valuing and recognizing educational research?

  • What are the ultimate qualifications and resources needed by fieldwork educators to provide the optimal learning experience for students?

  • What processes are most effective for building capacity in educational research?

  • What constitutes best practice in faculty development?

  • What is the profile of educational researchers in the profession?

  • What are effective ways to socialize clinicians, fieldwork educators, and new doctoral and postdoctoral graduates to be educators?

Table Footer NoteNote. IPE = interprofessional education; PBL = problem-based learning; TBL = team-based learning.
Note. IPE = interprofessional education; PBL = problem-based learning; TBL = team-based learning.×
×