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Editorial
Issue Date: September/October 2015
Published Online: November 02, 2015
Updated: April 30, 2020
Evolution of a Revolution in Occupational Therapy Education
Author Affiliations
  • Janice Posatery Burke, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Dean, Jefferson College of Health Professions, and Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, Thomas Jefferson University; Janice.Burke@jefferson.edu
  • Neil Harvison, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Chief Academic and Scientific Affairs Officer, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD.
Article Information
Education of OTs and OTAs
Editorial   |   November 02, 2015
Evolution of a Revolution in Occupational Therapy Education
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November 2015, Vol. 69, 6912170010. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.695S01
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November 2015, Vol. 69, 6912170010. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.695S01
Abstract

This issue of the American Journal of Occupational Therapy reflects an increase in the quantity and quality of scholarly projects submitted for publication in this special issue. The positive response to the call for papers is evidence of the focused interest that faculty, both academic and clinical, and practitioners have brought to their work of educating and preparing the next generation of occupational therapists. This article discusses educational issues from academic, student, and fieldwork points of view, further validating the pervasive commitment that is being made to further understanding of how occupational therapists are educated. The articles cover topics including the critical issues of curriculum, value and timing of fieldwork and simulation experiences, and documentation of strategies to measure the effects of comparative educational experiences.

In the 2014 inaugural publication of the education supplement of the American Journal of Occupational Therapy(AJOT), we wrote, “These articles promise to stimulate dialogue among academic and clinical educators and serve as a benchmark for an active and productive focus on education practices, outcomes, and the development of innovative models for teaching and learning” (Burke & Harvison, 2014, p. S2). Much to the credit of educators (academic and clinical), clinicians, and administrators in occupational therapy programs across the country and beyond, that publication (and Education Summit 2013) has indeed stimulated dialogue. As a result, we have witnessed an uptick in the quantity and quality of scholarly projects submitted for publication in this second education supplement and in response to the Call for Papers for the 2015 Education Summit. These positive responses are evidence of the focused interest that faculty, both academic and clinical, and practitioners have brought to their work of educating and preparing the next generation of occupational therapists. In turn, we have received strong support from the American Occupational Therapy Association in response to our call for increased venues in which to present and publish educational articles. Working collaboratively, we have moved education scholarship and research into a new era of discourse within the field replete with evidence-based projects that will inform curricula and fieldwork as they evolve.
Janice P. Burke, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA
Janice P. Burke, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA
×
Neil Harvison, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA
Neil Harvison, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA
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In this issue of AJOT are articles that address pedagogy and instructional design topics including the effects of specific curricular changes (Benevides, Vause-Earland, & Walsh, 2015; Schwartz & Smith, 2015), the use of simulation and standardized patients (Baird, Raina, Rogers, O’Donnell, & Holm, 2015; Baird, Raina, Rogers, O’Donnell, Terhorst, & Holm, 2015; Cahill, 2015) and tests (Avi-Itzhak, 2015), and the use of online synchronous learning (Aldrich & Johansson, 2015) as well as the production of data documenting educational outcomes that are inclusive of both student learner and educator (classroom, standardized patient, fieldwork) perspectives (Chapleau & Harrison, 2015; Evenson, Roberts, Kaldenberg, Barnes, & Ozelie, 2015; Grenier, 2015). That educational issues are addressed from academic, student, and fieldwork points of view further validates the pervasive commitment that is being made to further understanding of how occupational therapists are educated. Included in this issue is consideration of the critical issues of curricular offerings, the value and timing of fieldwork and simulation experiences, and the documentation of strategies used to measure the effect of comparative educational experiences (including when and how they are provided).
The authors of the articles in this issue have included a range of perspectives on the topic of learning. They set about to understand the experience by surveying, interviewing, and collecting data to understand and support education strategies and their perceived value to students. Similarly, they aimed to gain information for students at the master’s and doctoral levels, educators in the classroom and fieldwork environments, collaborators in research, and therapists involved in standardized patient encounters.
Rounding out this supplement is an article providing a well-thought-out consideration of the move to doctoral-level entry into the profession (Brown, Crabtree, Mu, & Wells, 2015) and a The Issue Is piece focusing on the importance of placing occupation as the centerpiece of occupational therapy education (Hooper et al., 2015). In the latter article, the authors provide both perspective and tangible ideas and strategies for academic and fieldwork educators.
It is exciting to see the innovations, energy, and most of all novel ideas that occupational therapy educators bring to the teaching enterprise. Through opportunities to present these ideas, demonstrate their effectiveness, and discuss their viability, we expect that we will continue to see substantial changes in how educational practices evolve. As we look to the future, we realize that we are evolving in our understanding of how to effectively and efficiently prepare occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants to meet societal needs. This progress will be the foundation for fundamental changes in our construction of new methods for teaching and learning in occupational therapy—truly the sign that we are all part of an educational revolution.
References
Aldrich, R. M., & Johansson, K. E. (2015). Brief Report—U.S. and Swedish student learning through online synchronous international interactions. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912350010. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.018424
Aldrich, R. M., & Johansson, K. E. (2015). Brief Report—U.S. and Swedish student learning through online synchronous international interactions. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912350010. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.018424×
Avi-Itzhak, T. (2015). Ability of the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy practice test to estimate the probability of first-time pass status on the national certification exam. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912185080. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.015024
Avi-Itzhak, T. (2015). Ability of the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy practice test to estimate the probability of first-time pass status on the national certification exam. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912185080. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.015024×
Baird, J. M., Raina, K. D., Rogers, J. C., O’Donnell, J., & Holm, M. B. (2015). Wheelchair transfer simulations to enhance procedural skills and clinical reasoning. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912185020. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.018697
Baird, J. M., Raina, K. D., Rogers, J. C., O’Donnell, J., & Holm, M. B. (2015). Wheelchair transfer simulations to enhance procedural skills and clinical reasoning. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912185020. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.018697×
Baird, J. M., Raina, K. D., Rogers, J. C., O’Donnell, J., Terhorst, L., & Holm, M. B. (2015). Simulation strategies to teach patient transfers: Self-efficacy by strategy. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912185030. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.018705
Baird, J. M., Raina, K. D., Rogers, J. C., O’Donnell, J., Terhorst, L., & Holm, M. B. (2015). Simulation strategies to teach patient transfers: Self-efficacy by strategy. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912185030. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.018705×
Benevides, T. W., Vause-Earland, T., & Walsh, R. (2015). Impact of a curricular change to promote evidence-based practice by occupational therapy graduates: A cohort study. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912185010. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.018416
Benevides, T. W., Vause-Earland, T., & Walsh, R. (2015). Impact of a curricular change to promote evidence-based practice by occupational therapy graduates: A cohort study. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912185010. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.018416×
Brown, T., Crabtree, J. L., Mu, K., & Wells, J. (2015). The Issue Is—The next paradigm shift in occupational therapy education: The increasing move to the entry-level clinical doctorate. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912360020. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.016527
Brown, T., Crabtree, J. L., Mu, K., & Wells, J. (2015). The Issue Is—The next paradigm shift in occupational therapy education: The increasing move to the entry-level clinical doctorate. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912360020. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.016527×
Burke, J. P., & Harvison, N. (2014). From the Desk of the Guest Editors—A systematic focus on occupational therapy education. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68(Suppl. 2), S1–S2. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2014.685S07 [Article] [PubMed]
Burke, J. P., & Harvison, N. (2014). From the Desk of the Guest Editors—A systematic focus on occupational therapy education. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68(Suppl. 2), S1–S2. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2014.685S07 [Article] [PubMed]×
Cahill, S. M. (2015). Case Report—Perspectives on the use of standardized parents to teach collaboration to graduate occupational therapy students. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912185040. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.017103
Cahill, S. M. (2015). Case Report—Perspectives on the use of standardized parents to teach collaboration to graduate occupational therapy students. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912185040. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.017103×
Chapleau, A., & Harrison, J. (2015). Fieldwork I program evaluation of student learning using Goal Attainment Scaling. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912185060. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.018325
Chapleau, A., & Harrison, J. (2015). Fieldwork I program evaluation of student learning using Goal Attainment Scaling. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912185060. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.018325×
Evenson, M. E., Roberts, M., Kaldenberg, J., Barnes, M. A., & Ozelie, R. (2015). Brief Report—National survey of fieldwork educators: Implications for occupational therapy education. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912350020. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.019265
Evenson, M. E., Roberts, M., Kaldenberg, J., Barnes, M. A., & Ozelie, R. (2015). Brief Report—National survey of fieldwork educators: Implications for occupational therapy education. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912350020. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.019265×
Grenier, M.-L. (2015). Facilitators and barriers to learning in occupational therapy fieldwork education: Student perspectives. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912185070. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.015180
Grenier, M.-L. (2015). Facilitators and barriers to learning in occupational therapy fieldwork education: Student perspectives. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912185070. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.015180×
Hooper, B., Mitcham, M. D., Taff, S. D., Price, P., Krishnagiri, S., & Bilics, A. (2015). The Issue Is—Energizing occupation as the center of teaching and learning. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912360010. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.018242
Hooper, B., Mitcham, M. D., Taff, S. D., Price, P., Krishnagiri, S., & Bilics, A. (2015). The Issue Is—Energizing occupation as the center of teaching and learning. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912360010. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.018242×
Schwartz, J. K., & Smith, R. O. (2015). A win–win: Benefits of student engagement in intervention research. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912185050. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.018200
Schwartz, J. K., & Smith, R. O. (2015). A win–win: Benefits of student engagement in intervention research. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69(Suppl. 2), 6912185050. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.018200×
Janice P. Burke, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA
Janice P. Burke, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA
×
Neil Harvison, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA
Neil Harvison, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA
×