Free
Poster Session
Issue Date: July 2015
Published Online: July 01, 2015
Updated: April 30, 2020
Afferent Stimulation via Glove Electrode With Task Specific Training Improves Function and Activity in Chronic Stroke
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Stroke / Prevention and Intervention
Poster Session   |   July 01, 2015
Afferent Stimulation via Glove Electrode With Task Specific Training Improves Function and Activity in Chronic Stroke
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 2015, Vol. 69, 6911515051. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.69S1-PO1096
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 2015, Vol. 69, 6911515051. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.69S1-PO1096
Abstract

Date Presented 4/16/2015

Combining task-specific training with afferent stimulation delivered via glove electrode in individuals with chronic stroke may result in changes at the arm sensation and function. Improvements were maintained at 3-mo follow-up.

INNOVATION: This study demonstrates innovation by translating new electrode technology and integrating it with the evidence-based interventions of electrical stimulation and task-specific training to examine whether the combination of these interventions improves upper extremity outcomes.
PURPOSE: Sensory amplitude electrical stimulation (SES) and task-specific training have both been shown to decrease impairment and improve function in the arm following stroke. These two interventions have rarely been implemented simultaneously but have demonstrated improved client outcomes when combined. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of SES delivered by glove electrode during task-specific training activities on arm mobility, function, and sensation in chronic stroke.
METHOD: Eleven subjects (4 women, 7 men) with chronic upper extremity hemiparesis following stroke participated in the study. The design consisted of an intervention pilot study, pretest, posttest, and follow-up. The setting consisted of a university research laboratory and home-based intervention. Subjects engaged in task-specific training at home for 30 min, twice daily, for 5 wk, while receiving SES via glove electrode. Subjects returned for supervised practice at least twice during intervention. Outcome measures administered at pretest, posttest, and 3-mo follow-up included the following: Jebsen–Taylor Hand Function Test (JTHFT), Upper-Extremity (UE) subscale of the Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment Measure (STREAM), Motor Activity Log—14 (MAL–14), and Nottingham Stereognosis Assessment (NSA). Data were analyzed using parametric statistical tests.
RESULTS: Significant changes were found in group mean changes pre–post on NSA (p = .043) and JTHFT (with writing item excluded; p = .003). Group mean changes pre–post on the MAL–14 (Amount subscale) approached significance (p = .054). Mean group change pretest to follow-up was significant on the NSA (p = .019) and JTHFT (writing item excluded; p = .009). Individuals with a higher baseline motor capacity and more recent stroke had significantly more improvements.
CONCLUSION: Combining task-specific training with SES delivered via glove electrode in individuals with chronic stroke may result in changes in arm sensation and function. Improvements were maintained at 3-mo follow-up. This study demonstrates that SES during task-specific training implemented in a home-based intervention with minimal supervised practice time may reduce impairment and may increase function poststroke.