Free
Poster Session
Issue Date: July 01, 2015
Published Online: February 09, 2016
Updated: January 01, 2020
Factors That Affect the Retirement Transition for the Baby Boomer Generation and Implications for Occupational Therapy
Author Affiliations
  • Grand Valley State University
  • Grand Valley State University
  • Grand Valley State University
  • Grand Valley State University
Article Information
Evidence-Based Practice / Health and Wellness / Health Services Research and Education
Poster Session   |   July 01, 2015
Factors That Affect the Retirement Transition for the Baby Boomer Generation and Implications for Occupational Therapy
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 2015, Vol. 69, 6911510043. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.69S1-PO2101
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 2015, Vol. 69, 6911510043. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.69S1-PO2101
Abstract

Date Presented 4/16/2015

The review includes the identification of factors that affect the retirement transition for the baby boomer generation and implications for the field of occupational therapy in this novel practice area, such as opportunities to collaborate with these clients to increase quality of life and wellness.

SIGNIFICANCE: There is a void in the research regarding factors that affect this growing generation’s retirement transition as well as evidence regarding interventions that occupational therapists can implement during this life transition. This conducted systematic review involves the identification of novel opportunities and outlets that allow for the field of occupational therapy to expand and develop.
INNOVATION: We conducted a systematic review to identify factors that affect the baby boomers’ retirement transition as well as novel opportunities for occupational therapy to become involved with a current and imminent life transition for this generation.
APPROACH: Currently, research emphasizes how financial aspects can affect the retirement transition for the baby boomer generation. There is a void in the literature regarding nonfinancial impacts, and as baby boomers continue to transition into retirement, there is a need for exploration of social, psychological, and cultural aspects to identify outlets for occupational therapists to promote wellness and quality of life.
Research questions included the following: What are the psychosocial and sociocultural factors that affect the retirement transition of the baby boomers? How can occupational therapy assist this generation with the transition?
METHOD: To perform the systematic review on the stated topic area, we searched several databases, including CINAHL Plus (EBSCO), PubMed, PsycINFO, and SocINDEX. Inclusion and exclusion factors were established for the review process; articles that matched inclusion criteria were further analyzed to identify sociocultural and psychosocial factors related to baby boomers’ retirement transition. Following, these factors were hierarchically organized into themes and subthemes, which were further explored to propose the role of occupational therapy within this area of practice.
Inclusion criteria included studies based on the baby boomer generation and psychosocial and sociocultural factors involved with retirement and/or the retirement transition. The 30 articles reviewed were ranked (1 to 5) on the basis of a level of evidence hierarchy reflecting the study’s level of methodological rigor.
We used a triangulation method to ensure trustworthiness of the database review as well as thematic coding. The thematic coding process began with each researcher participating in open, axial, and selective coding.
RESULTS: Findings suggest a need for occupational therapy to assist with the transition for the large population of baby boomers expecting to retire over the next 16 years, due to the profession’s skilled ability to promote wellness via consideration of sociocultural and psychosocial factors. Therapists can collaborate with clients and on a broader scale with programs, employers, organizations, and institutions to allow clients to reach desired goals and lifestyles throughout the transition. Two key routes by which intervention can occur are wellness program implementation and life coach utilization. Occupational therapists can facilitate and empower this generation to enhance wellness during retirement by providing education, support, and access to other resources.
CONCLUSION: This unique population demands various retirement outcomes compared to previous generations in relation to health, support, work, and generational culture. To enhance the transition for this population, occupational therapists can implement interventions into the baby boomers’ natural contexts to promote wellness and overall quality of life.