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Issue Date: July 01, 2015
Published Online: February 09, 2016
Updated: January 01, 2020
Group Leader Self-Assessment (GLSA): Establishing Validity
Author Affiliations
  • Tufts University
  • Tufts University
  • Tufts University
  • Tufts University
  • Tufts University
  • Tufts University
Article Information
Education of OTs and OTAs / Occupational Therapy Practice Framework / Professional Issues / Assessment/Measurement
Poster Session   |   July 01, 2015
Group Leader Self-Assessment (GLSA): Establishing Validity
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 2015, Vol. 69, 6911500092. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.69S1-PO3085
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 2015, Vol. 69, 6911500092. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2015.69S1-PO3085
Abstract

Date Presented 4/17/2015

The results of this descriptive research support the current structure and viability of the Group Leader Self-Assessment (GLSA) as an outcome measure for group leader training in occupational therapy education.

SIGNIFICANCE: Presently, there are no succinct tools available to measure outcomes of group leader training (GLT). This is problematic, considering that the ability to “design and implement group interventions” (Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education [ACOTE], 2011, p. 23) is a curricular standard of occupational therapy education. The Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process (American Occupational Therapy Association [AOTA], 2014) identifies group as an intervention, making effective GLT essential. Tools to measure leader confidence and competence exist; however, they are limited in number and have varying foci (self-assessments vs. observer ratings vs. member ratings of leader), varying ranges of psychometrics, and differing needs for training and/or user friendliness. The Group Leader Self-Assessment (GLSA) measures change in leader trainees’ perception of their group leader skills after GLT. The significance of this descriptive research is its support of the GLSA. It establishes preliminary psychometrics of the tool as an outcome measure, which can be used to facilitate the education of group leader trainees.
METHOD: Convergent and divergent validity were examined to determine whether four proposed GLSA subscales, derived from four leader functions posited in the literature (Yalom & Leszcz, 2005), exist. We hypothesized that the GLSA will have good convergent validity (α >.80) within individual subscales and good divergent validity (α < .50) between the proposed subscales. GLSA prescores from a convenience sample (N = 67) recruited from Master of Science in Occupational Therapy (MSOT) students (average age = 25.8 yr) receiving GLT (Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013) were analyzed. GLSA data were gathered via Qualtrics Survey software at the beginning of GLT as part of a course assignment. Data were analyzed with Pearson’s correlation coefficients and Cronbach’s alphas. Cronbach’s alpha, a reliability coefficient measuring internal consistency, was used to determine convergent validity of items within and across the four proposed subscales.
RESULTS: A strong Cronbach’s alpha (α = .89) was found across all subscale items, indicating that all subscales relate to the construct of group leadership. Cronbach’s alphas for items within each subscale revealed good to moderate convergent validity, suggesting that each subscale measures a distinct leadership function. Overall, Cronbach’s alpha for the tool was strong (α = .91). Cronbach’s alpha and Pearson’s r were used to further assess divergent validity between subscales with low values, suggesting that subscales are measuring different leader functions. Therefore, each subscale is measuring a distinct concept related to the overarching theme of leadership.
CONCLUSION: The data offer support for the GLSA as a viable outcome measure for GLT in occupational therapy.
References
Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education. (2011). 2011 Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) standards and interpretive guide (effective July 31, 2013). Retrieved from https://www.aota.org/-/media/Corporate/Files/EducationCareers/Accredit/Standards/2011-Standards-and-Interpretive-Guide.pdf
American Occupational Therapy Association. (2014). Occupational therapy practice framework: Domain and process (3rd ed.). American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68(Suppl. 1), S1–S48. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2014.682006
Yalom, I. D., & Leszcz, M. (2005). The theory and practice of group psychotherapy (5th ed.). New York: Basic.