Free
Poster Session
Issue Date: August 2016
Published Online: August 01, 2016
Updated: January 01, 2021
Allied Health and Nursing Students' Knowledge of Stroke Risk Factors and Warning Signs in Older Adults and Young Females
Author Affiliations
  • University of South Alabama
Article Information
Geriatrics/Productive Aging / Health and Wellness / Neurologic Conditions / Stroke / Prevention and Intervention
Poster Session   |   August 01, 2016
Allied Health and Nursing Students' Knowledge of Stroke Risk Factors and Warning Signs in Older Adults and Young Females
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2016, Vol. 70, 7011515262. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2016.70S1-PO4082
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2016, Vol. 70, 7011515262. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2016.70S1-PO4082
Abstract

Date Presented 4/8/2016

This research highlights the need for further education of allied health and nursing students about risk factors and warning signs of stroke in both older adults and young women. Early identification and treatment are key to an improved outcome.

Primary Author and Speaker: Donna Wooster

Contributing Authors: Kelli Brogan, Chelsea Ready, Corey Sharp, Terese Singleton, Chasity Robinson, Katie Taylor

PURPOSE: This study was designed to compare knowledge of stroke risk factors and warning signs for elderly adults and young female adults among allied health and nursing students.
RATIONALE: Globally, stroke is one of the leading causes of physical illness and disability. Public awareness efforts provide education on the risk factors, signs and symptoms, and appropriate actions to take when one is suspected of having a stroke, but is aimed at the older adult population. Current statistics and medical documentation indicate that an increasing number of young women ages 21–50 yr are having strokes. Some young women who seek medical treatment for their symptoms are given an incorrect diagnosis or turned away. This research sought to identify allied health and nursing students’ knowledge of the risk factors and warning signs of stroke in older adults and younger female adults.
HYPOTHESIS: Allied health and nursing students would lack adequate knowledge regarding stroke risk factors and warning signs in young women but would have the knowledge for the older adults.
DESIGN: This study was a descriptive study to determine current knowledge levels of allied health and nursing students regarding stroke risk factors and warning signs.
PARTICIPANTS: Participants (N = 395) were comprised of 154 allied health students and 241 nursing students in graduate and undergraduate education programs.
METHOD: An online survey was designed in SurveyMonkey to collect demographic data and to determine current knowledge. Four open-ended questions asked students to describe the signs and symptoms and risk factors/warning signs of stroke in an elderly population and then a young female population.
ANALYSIS: Responses to the open-ended questions were then coded by hand by at least two different researchers utilizing a predetermined answer key with set points. Each question was worth ≥25 points for a total score of 100. Both descriptive and inferential data analysis were conducted. Descriptive statistics were used to determine characteristics of our population such as gender, age, and college major. Data analysis consisted of a one-tailed t test to compare mean scores acquired on the test for the elderly population with the mean scores acquired for the young female population.
RESULTS: Statistically significant results were found (p ≤ .001), demonstrating both allied health and nursing students knew more risk factors for the older adult population than the younger female population of stroke patients. Results indicate that, in general, allied health and nursing students lack appropriate knowledge of stroke risk factors and warning signs for both populations. Nursing and allied health students should be able to articulate warning signs and risk factors for stroke.
DISCUSSION: Allied health and nursing education programs need to provide better education regarding stroke for both age groups.
IMPACT STATEMENT: This proposal is important to illustrate both the need for further education about stroke risk factors and warning signs and to emphasize the need for specific education for young women who may be misdiagnosed without this knowledge.