Free
Poster Session
Issue Date: August 2016
Published Online: August 01, 2016
Updated: January 01, 2021
Participation and Quality of Life of Young Adults With Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Longitudinal Study
Author Affiliations
  • Hadassah and Hebrew University
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Basic Research
Poster Session   |   August 01, 2016
Participation and Quality of Life of Young Adults With Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Longitudinal Study
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2016, Vol. 70, 7011505142. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2016.70S1-PO4108
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2016, Vol. 70, 7011505142. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2016.70S1-PO4108
Abstract

Date Presented 4/8/2016

The results of the current study indicated that young adults with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) continue to report decreased participation and reduce quality of life (QOL). Participation and QOL should be addressed in assessment and treatment of young adults with DCD.

Primary Author and Speaker: Miri Tal-Saban

Contributing Authors: Asher Ornoy, Shula Parush

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the continuing influence of developmental coordination disorder (DCD) on participation and quality of life (QoL).
RATIONALE: DCD is a severe impairment of motor coordination that significantly interferes with academic achievement and activities of daily living (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th ed.; American Psychiatric Association, 2014). There is a growing body of evidence regarding the symptoms and implications of DCD in young adults that seems to imply that when DCD continues into adulthood it may result in slowness, clumsiness, reduced participation in a wide range of activities, and decreased QoL. Despite the expanding body of knowledge concerning DCD in older populations in recent years, there is still insufficient research evidence regarding this population in general and especially longitudinal studies.
METHOD: From a random sample of 2,379 adolescents and young adults ages 19–25, the following three study groups were identified (N = 429) based on the Adolescents & Adults Coordination Questionnaire. The DCD group included 135 participants, the borderline DCD group included 149 participants, and the control group included 145 participants. The 429 participants of the initial study were contacted between 3 and 4 yr after initial testing and asked to participate in the follow-up study.
This study consisted of 96 individuals: 25 DCD (mean [M] age = 24.35 yr, standard deviation [SD] = 0.88; 52% men); 30 borderline DCD (M age = 24.48 yr, SD = 0.98; 43.3% men), and 41 typical individuals (mean age = 25.82 yr, SD = 1.91; 48.8% men).
Ethical approval to perform the follow-up study was granted by the Institutional Ethics Committee. Individuals who agreed to participate were sent the questionnaires by post or by mail. All participants signed an informed consent form to participate in this study.
MEASURES: The Participation in Every Day Activities of Life questionnaire assessed the participation of young adults in daily activities requiring coordination and organization. The Life-Satisfaction Questionnaire assessed general and domain-specific areas of satisfaction. The World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL–BREF) was administered to assess the domains of physical health, psychological health, social relationships, and environment.
RESULTS: A multivariate analysis of variance used to assess group differences on the three questionnaires revealed a statistically significant difference, F(7, 95) = 2.89, p = .001, η = .173. To examine the source of this difference, the data from each questionnaire was subjected to analysis of variance. Significant between-groups differences (p < .001) were found for all measures with the exception of the social relations domain on the WHOQOL–BREF. Scheffé post hoc analyses revealed that the DCD and borderline DCD groups performed significantly worse than the control group. Linear regression found the psychological domain of the WHOQOL–BREF to be a significant predictor of life satisfaction (B = 0.533, p = .001).
The findings of this longitudinal study show that young adults with DCD continue to report decreased participation in various daily life activities and reduced QoL in comparison to individuals without DCD.
DISCUSSION: Young adults with DCD continue to report decreased participation in various daily life activities. Furthermore, it appears that at older ages, the life satisfaction and QoL of individuals with DCD is reduced in comparison to individuals without motor difficulties.
IMPACT STATEMENT: This study provides evidence supporting the continuation of DCD into adulthood and indicates the necessity of assessments and intervention for young adults in occupational therapy. These results strengthened the understanding of the functional implications of DCD in young adults that go beyond problems in coordination.
References
American Psychiatric Association. (2014). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing.