Free
Poster Session
Issue Date: August 2016
Published Online: August 01, 2016
Updated: January 01, 2021
Assessing the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Technology in Children
Author Affiliations
  • Maryville University
  • Maryville University
  • Maryville University
  • Maryville University
  • Maryville University
  • Maryville University
Article Information
Assistive Technology / Assessment/Measurement
Poster Session   |   August 01, 2016
Assessing the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Technology in Children
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2016, Vol. 70, 7011500080. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2016.70S1-PO7098
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2016, Vol. 70, 7011500080. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2016.70S1-PO7098
Abstract

Date Presented 4/9/2016

The Children’s Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale is a 15-item, self-report outcome measure designed to assess the effects an assistive technology device has on the quality of life of children. Initial statistical analysis indicates good reliability and internal consistency.

Primary Author and Speaker: Bob Cunningham

Additional Authors and Speakers: Amanda Rzepczynski, Micaela Surdyke, Megan Moldenhauer, Kaitlin Bethel, Della Spratt

The purpose of this research was to develop a tool that assesses the impact of assistive technology (AT) on the quality of life (QOL) in children and to assess the tool’s reliability and validity. This presentation will report on the Children’s Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scales (C–PIADS), a self-report questionnaire based on the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale (PIADS). The PIADS is a reliable and valid tool that measures the psychosocial impact of assistive devices on QOL in adults.
AT is increasingly being used as an occupational therapy intervention for children with disabilities. The literature indicates that a positive relationship exists between the increased independence offered through the use of AT and the user’s QOL. The increased use of AT necessitates the use of appropriate outcome measures to evaluate the effectiveness of these devices. Development of a measure that assesses the effect AT has on QOL can contribute to understanding the impact it has on a user’s everyday functioning.
This study is part of an ongoing research project aimed at developing a tool that measures the psychosocial impact of AT devices on the QOL in children. Specifically, this project involved modifying the PIADS. The research was conducted using a methodological approach. Construction of the tool was informed by a previous research. A qualitative study consisting of interviews with children who use AT and their parents determined that the PIADS constructs were appropriate for use with children. Additionally, a previous quantitative study was conducted to determine children’s preferences in regard to response format and appropriate wording for test items.
A convenience sample of 59 children ages 6 to 17 yr who wear glasses or contact lens was used. The students all attended parochial schools and were recruited with the assistance of the schools’ principals and faculty. A recruitment letter was distributed to all the students who met the inclusion criteria. Incentives were used to encourage participation.
The C–PIADS, a 15-item, self-report questionnaire was developed for the study. The tool utilizes a 5-point “Smiley Face” scale and short phrases to assess the same three constructs as the PIADS (competence, adaptability, and self-esteem). The C-PIADS was administered twice with a break of 3 wk between administrations. The data were assessed for reliability (internal consistency and test retest), factor analysis, and discriminant validity. Internal consistency (.894 using Cronbach’s α) and test–retest reliability (.864) were found to be significant. Factor loading indicates that a majority of the items were consistent with corresponding constructs. The tool was unable to clearly discriminate among different classifications of the participants’ ability to see without glasses, but a developing trend was noted.
On the basis of the results of the statistical analysis, the response format and terminology in the C–PIADS are appropriate for children. Future research should include using the tool on children with a wider variety of limitations and different types of AT.
The C–PIADS addresses an unmet need in the area of outcome assessment by measuring the psychosocial impact of being able to engage in preferred occupations through the use of AT. Its application to all types of AT make it a valuable tool for occupational therapists to consider.