Free
Poster Session
Issue Date: August 2016
Published Online: August 01, 2016
Updated: January 01, 2021
Lived Experiences of Families: Outcomes of Participation in an Interprofessional Education Program
Author Affiliations
  • University of Central Arkansas
  • University of Central Arkansas
  • University of Central Arkansas
Article Information
Education of OTs and OTAs / Multidisciplinary Practice / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Basic Research
Poster Session   |   August 01, 2016
Lived Experiences of Families: Outcomes of Participation in an Interprofessional Education Program
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2016, Vol. 70, 7011505176. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2016.70S1-PO7099
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2016, Vol. 70, 7011505176. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2016.70S1-PO7099
Abstract

Date Presented 4/9/2016

This qualitative research explored the outcomes and decision-making process of parents of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities who participated in an interprofessional program for health professionals. Findings suggest that problem-based learning is beneficial for participating families.

Primary Author and Speaker: Monica Beard-Raymond

Additional Authors and Speakers: Sarah Holloway, Tina Mankey

This qualitative research explored the outcomes and decision-making process of parents of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities who participated in an interdisciplinary training program for health professionals. In the program, interprofessional students interviewed and provided parents with information through a problem-based learning (PBL) format.
Research has indicated that PBL is beneficial to students in the health professions (Albanese & Mitchell, 1993), but little is known about the lived experiences of participants. Only two found studies examined the participant’s experience, and neither study applies to parents of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities (Aspegren, Blomqvist, & Borgstrom, 1998; Goelen, De Clercq, Huyghens, & Kerckhofs, 2006). In addition, there is little research on parental decision making, but one study suggested families largely ignore recommendations from health providers (Hinojosa & Anderson, 1991).
A qualitative research design was chosen because it is beneficial when little is known about a subject (Creswell, 2014). Purposive criterion sampling was used to select research participants who had participated with the PBL program within the past 5 yr. Participants were recruited by mail, phone, and email, and the first 6 families to respond were selected. All participants interviewed were married, Caucasian mothers. One participant had a child with cerebral palsy and the rest of the children had autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
Participants were interviewed face-to-face using a semistructured interview guide. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, coded, and analyzed for emergent themes. The data were validated through member checking of transcriptions and the use of an external peer review. Reliability was enhanced through checking transcripts and cross-checking codes.
The results of this research revealed that 4 families took direct action for the benefit of the child as a result of participating in the program. Indirect outcomes from participation include satisfaction with educating future health professionals and gaining resources for future consideration . Participants utilized resources and recommendations that addressed a specific need identified by the parent or that were communicated clearly. Participants disregarded resources when there was a negative past experience with the recommendation or when other priorities took precedence.
Overall, findings suggest that families found the PBL process to be beneficial. Families tend to adapt recommendations to fit their individual needs. Findings on family decision making confirm the principles of family-centered care regarding family responsiveness, collaborative communication, and taking a holistic approach with regard to family needs and priorities.
References
Albanese, M. A., & Mitchell, S. (1993). Problem-based learning: A review of the literature on its outcomes and implementation issues. Academic Medicine, 68, 52–81.
Aspegren, K., Blomqvist, P., & Borgstrom, A. (1998). Live patients and problem-based learning. Medical Teacher, 20, 417–420. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01421599880490
Creswell, J. W. (2014). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods approaches (4th ed.). Los Angeles: Sage.
Goelen, G., De Clercq, G., Huyghens, L., & Kerckhofs, E. (2006). Measuring the effect of interprofessional problem-based learning on the attitudes of undergraduate health care students. Medical Education, 40, 555–561. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2929.2006.02478.x
Hinojosa, J., & Anderson, J. (1991). Mothers’ perceptions of home treatment programs for their preschool children with cerebral palsy. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 45, 273–279. http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.45.3.272