Research Article  |   July 2017
Clinical Effectiveness of Occupational Therapy in Mental Health: A Meta-Analysis
Author Affiliations
  • Moses N. Ikiugu, PhD, OTR/L, is Professor and Director of Research, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of South Dakota, Vermillion; moses.ikiugu@usd.edu
  • Ranelle M. Nissen, PhD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor and Academic Fieldwork Coordinator, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of South Dakota, Vermillion
  • Cali Bellar, OTD, was Student, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, at the time of the study
  • Alexya Maassen, OTD, is Occupational Therapist, Reliant Rehabilitation, Hull, IA. At the time of the study, she was Student, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of South Dakota, Vermillion
  • Katlin Van Peursem, OTD, is Occupational Therapist, Sanford Health, Sheldon, IA. At the time of the study, she was Student, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of South Dakota, Vermillion
Article Information
Evidence-Based Practice / Mental Health / Centennial Topics
Research Article   |   July 2017
Clinical Effectiveness of Occupational Therapy in Mental Health: A Meta-Analysis
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 2017, Vol. 71, 7105100020p1-7105100020p10. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.024588
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 2017, Vol. 71, 7105100020p1-7105100020p10. doi:10.5014/ajot.2017.024588
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to estimate the effectiveness of theory-based occupational therapy interventions in improving occupational performance and well-being among people with a mental health diagnosis.

METHOD. The meta-analysis included 11 randomized controlled trials with a total of 520 adult participants with a mental health diagnosis. Outcomes were occupational performance, well-being, or both. We conducted meta-analyses using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software (Version 3.0) with occupational performance and well-being as the dependent variables.

RESULTS. Results indicated a medium effect of intervention on improving occupational performance (mean Hedge’s g = 0.50, Z = 4.05, p < .001) and a small effect on well-being (mean Hedge’s g = 0.46, Z = 4.96, p < .001).

CONCLUSION. Theory-based occupational therapy interventions may be effective in improving occupational performance and well-being among people with a mental health diagnosis and should be an integral part of rehabilitation services in mental health.