Research Article  |   December 2017
Criterion Validity of the Child’s Challenging Behavior Scale, Version 2 (CCBS–2)
Author Affiliations
  • Helen M. Bourke-Taylor, PhD, is Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Primary and Allied Health Care, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; helen.bourke-taylor@monash.edu
  • Reinie Cordier, PhD, is Associate Professor, School of Occupational Therapy and Social Work, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Bentley, Perth, Western Australia
  • Julie F. Pallant, PhD, is Adjunct Associate Professor, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Article Information
Assessment Development and Testing / Mental Health / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 2017
Criterion Validity of the Child’s Challenging Behavior Scale, Version 2 (CCBS–2)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, December 2017, Vol. 72, 7201205010p1-7201205010p9. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.023366
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, December 2017, Vol. 72, 7201205010p1-7201205010p9. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.023366
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The Child’s Challenging Behavior Scale, Version 2 (CCBS–2), measures maternal rating of a child’s challenging behaviors that compromise maternal mental health. The CCBS–2, the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) were compared in a sample of typically developing young Australian children.

METHOD. Criterion validity was investigated by correlating the CCBS–2 with “gold standard” measures (CBCL and SDQ subscales). Data were collected in a cross-sectional survey of mothers (N = 336) of children ages 3–9 yr.

RESULTS. Correlations with the CBCL externalizing subscales demonstrated moderate (ρ = .46) to strong (ρ = .66) correlations. Correlations with the SDQ externalizing behaviors subscales were moderate (ρ = .35) to strong (ρ = .60).

CONCLUSION. The criterion validity established in this study strengthens the psychometric properties that support ongoing development of the CCBS–2 as an efficient tool that may identify children in need of further evaluation.