Research Article  |   January 2018
Development of an Item Pool Reflecting Cognitive Concerns Expressed by People With HIV
Author Affiliations
  • Sorayya Askari, PhD, is Occupational Therapist, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Lesley Fellows, MD, DPhil, is Assistant Dean, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Marie-Josée Brouillette, MD, is Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Carolina Moriello, is Research Assistant, Division of Clinical Epidemiology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Martin Duracinsky, MD, PhD, is Scientific Director, Patient-Centered Outcomes Research, Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, France, and Médecin, Service de Médecine Interne et d’Immunologie Clinique, Hôpital Bicêtre, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Kremlin-Bicêtre, France
  • Nancy E. Mayo, PhD, is James McGill Professor, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, and Research Scientist, Center of Outcome Research and Evaluation, Research Institute of McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; nancy.mayo@mcgill.ca
Article Information
Assessment Development and Testing / Multidisciplinary Practice / Neurologic Conditions / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 2018
Development of an Item Pool Reflecting Cognitive Concerns Expressed by People With HIV
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January 2018, Vol. 72, 7202205070p1-7202205070p9. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.023945
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January 2018, Vol. 72, 7202205070p1-7202205070p9. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.023945
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The overall aim of this study is to create an item pool reflecting the cognitive concerns expressed by people with HIV as a first step toward developing such a measure.

METHOD. Semiqualitative interviews with 292 people with HIV were carried out. Their concerns were mapped to neurocognitive domains to identify concern content areas and were compared with existing cognitive questionnaires. A questionnaire was developed to estimate the prevalence and importance of the items.

RESULTS. Sixty of 125 items were retained in the questionnaire based on ratings of their prevalence, importance, and clarity. Memory and behavioral and emotional concerns were the most common content areas (15 each); other domains were attention (7), executive function (6), language (5), and cognitive change (12).

CONCLUSION. People living with HIV experience difficulties in all domains of cognition. By recognizing all domains, this new measure can help clinicians better understand areas of perceived cognitive difficulty and plan interventions accordingly.