Research Article  |   January 2018
Mirror Therapy and Task-Oriented Training for People With a Paretic Upper Extremity
Author Affiliations
  • Salvador Bondoc, OTD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor and Chair of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Sciences, Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT; salvador.bondoc@qu.edu
  • Julie Booth, DPT, PCS, is Clinical Associate Professor of Physical Therapy, School of Health Sciences, Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT
  • Grace Budde, MOT, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, Professional Hand Therapy, Merrick, NY
  • Katelyn Caruso, MOT, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, Excel Orthopaedic Specialists, Woburn, MA
  • Michelle DeSousa, DPT, is Physical Therapist, Lawrence + Memorial Hospital, New London, CT
  • Brittany Earl, MOT, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, CareOne at Wall, Wall Township, NJ
  • Kaitlynn Hammerton, DPT, is Physical Therapist, Burke Rehabilitation Hospital, White Plains, NY
  • Jill Humphreys, DPT, is Physical Therapist, The Center at Lowry, Denver, CO
Article Information
Hand and Upper Extremity / Neurologic Conditions / Stroke / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 2018
Mirror Therapy and Task-Oriented Training for People With a Paretic Upper Extremity
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January 2018, Vol. 72, 7202205080p1-7202205080p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.025064
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January 2018, Vol. 72, 7202205080p1-7202205080p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.025064
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. This study investigates the effect of mirror therapy and task-oriented training on the paretic upper extremity function and occupational performance of people with stroke.

METHOD. This study used a repeated-measures, case-series design in which 4 participants completed a 4-wk intervention consisting of mirror therapy and task-specific training. The intervention was conducted 2×/wk in the clinic and 4×/wk at home.

RESULTS. All participants displayed clinically meaningful improvements in self-identified goals at the end of the intervention and at follow-up. Three participants showed clinically meaningful changes in motor function. Although only 1 participant improved in his reported amount of use, all participants showed clinically meaningful improvements in perceived movement quality at varying points of assessment.

CONCLUSION. Mirror therapy, when used as priming for task-oriented training, can produce clinical improvements in upper extremity function and occupational performance in people with hemiparesis.