Research Article  |   January 2018
Lighting as a Compensatory Strategy for Acquired Visual Deficits After Stroke: Two Case Reports
Author Affiliations
  • Matthew Green, MSOT, OTR/L, is Staff Therapist, Inpatient Rehabilitation Unit, Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center, Idaho Falls; matt.green@hcahealthcare.com
  • Beth Barstow, PhD, OTR/L, SCLV, FAOTA, is Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Laura Vogtle, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor and Program Director, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Stroke / Vision / Case Report
Research Article   |   January 2018
Lighting as a Compensatory Strategy for Acquired Visual Deficits After Stroke: Two Case Reports
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January 2018, Vol. 72, 7202210010p1-7202210010p6. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.023382
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January 2018, Vol. 72, 7202210010p1-7202210010p6. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.023382
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The objective of this article was to explore the effects of enhanced lighting on the function of people with an acquired visual deficit resulting from cerebrovascular accident (CVA) in an inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF).

METHOD. An ABAB design was used with two cases to assess how a short-term intervention involving lighting changes affected clients’ grooming performance in an IRF. Analysis consisted of scores on the grooming section of the FIM®, times for each grooming task, and light meter readings.

RESULTS. Both participants demonstrated improvements in function as measured by the FIM and in time to complete grooming tasks with enhanced lighting.

CONCLUSION. These results suggest that individualized lighting can lead to improved grooming function in clients with CVA.