Research Article  |   March 2018
Gender Differences in Psychosocial and Physical Outcomes in Haitian Amputees
Author Affiliations
  • Pey-Shan Wen, PhD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, Byrdine F. Lewis College of Nursing and Health Professions, Georgia State University, Atlanta; pwen@gsu.edu
  • Marilys G. Randolph, PhD, PT, is Retired; she was Associate Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Florida International University, Miami
  • Leonard Elbaum, PhD, PT, is Retired; he was Associate Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Florida International University, Miami
  • Mario De la Rosa, MSSA, PhD, is Professor, Department of Social Work, Robert Stempel College of Public Health and Social Work, Florida International University, Miami
Article Information
Mental Health / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 2018
Gender Differences in Psychosocial and Physical Outcomes in Haitian Amputees
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March 2018, Vol. 72, 7203205090p1-7203205090p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.022962
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March 2018, Vol. 72, 7203205090p1-7203205090p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.022962
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to investigate the gender differences in psychosocial and physical outcomes in users of lower-extremity prostheses who became amputees after the 2010 earthquake in Haiti.

METHOD. We enrolled 140 unilateral amputees in this cross-sectional study in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Trained staff administered the assessments by reading the questions aloud to participants. Participants completed the Trinity Amputation and Prosthesis Experience Scales and Locomotor Capabilities Index about 2 yr after the earthquake.

RESULTS. We found no gender differences in psychosocial adjustment and physical outcomes, except for strenuous physical activities and phantom pain, and both genders reported difficulty in social adjustment. After controlling for strenuous physical activities and phantom pain, we found that men showed worse psychosocial adjustment than women.

CONCLUSION. Services for psychosocial adjustment are critical for traumatic amputees and should be incorporated into rehabilitation programs after a disaster. Interventions should consider gender roles in the indigenous culture.