Research Article  |   March 2018
Relationship Between Sensory Processing and Participation in Daily Occupations for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review of Studies That Used Dunn’s Sensory Processing Framework
Author Affiliations
  • Noor Ismael, PhD, OT, is Assistant Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan; ntismael@just.edu.jo. At the time of this study she was PhD Student, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Lisa Mische Lawson, PhD, CTRS, is Associate Professor, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Julie Hartwell, MLIS, is Instructional Design Librarian, University of Missouri, Kansas City
Article Information
Autism/Autism Spectrum Disorder / Evidence-Based Practice / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Sensory Integration and Processing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 2018
Relationship Between Sensory Processing and Participation in Daily Occupations for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review of Studies That Used Dunn’s Sensory Processing Framework
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March 2018, Vol. 72, 7203205030p1-7203205030p9. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.024075
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March 2018, Vol. 72, 7203205030p1-7203205030p9. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.024075
Abstract

Research measuring sensory processing in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has shown variability in terms of measures used and participant ages, contributing to difficulty in interpreting and summarizing the findings of these studies. In an attempt to clarify the status of the literature, we conducted a systematic review of studies that focused on participation in daily occupations and evaluated sensory processing in children with ASD aged 5–13 yr using Dunn’s sensory processing framework. Evidence from 7 studies shows that sensory processing has a significant impact on participation in daily life of children with ASD. Included studies demonstrated medium and low levels of evidence. Additional research using more robust scientific methods is needed.