Research Article  |   June 2018
Revised Self-Report Assessment of Functional Visual Performance (R–SRAFVP)—Part I: Content Validation
Author Affiliations
  • Cheryl L. Zemina, MS, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, Hawthorne Health and Rehab Center, Brandon, FL
  • Mary Warren, PhD, OTR/L, SCLV, FAOTA, is Associate Professor and Director, Graduate Certificate in Low Vision Rehabilitation, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Hon K. Yuen, PhD, OTR/L, is Professor and Director of Research, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham; yuen@uab.edu
Article Information
Geriatrics/Productive Aging / Vision / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 2018
Revised Self-Report Assessment of Functional Visual Performance (R–SRAFVP)—Part I: Content Validation
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, June 2018, Vol. 72, 7205205010p1-7205205010p7. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.030197
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, June 2018, Vol. 72, 7205205010p1-7205205010p7. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.030197
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We describe the development and content validation of the revised Self-Report Assessment of Functional Visual Performance (R–SRAFVP).

METHOD. The content validation process consisted of three stages: (1) three occupational therapy experts in low vision rehabilitation revised items on the 38-item SRAFVP via written feedback and semistructured interview, (2) eight occupational therapy low vision experts evaluated items for relevance and provided feedback on the rating scale, and (3) five adults with low vision provided feedback on item clarity via cognitive interviewing.

RESULTS. In Stage 1 review, 21 items were added, totaling 59 items. In Stage 2 evaluation, 9 items were eliminated, resulting in the 50-item R–SRAFVP with a 4-point scale. The scale content validity index of the R–SRAFVP was .9. Stage 3 cognitive interviewing provided no substantive changes in content.

CONCLUSION. R–SRAFVP content was relevant to evaluate the ability of adults with low vision to complete vision-dependent daily tasks and was understandable by these participants.