Brief Report  |   June 2018
The Immediate Effect of African Drumming on the Mental Well-Being of Adults With Mood Disorders: An Uncontrolled Pretest–Posttest Pilot Study
Author Affiliations
  • Nicola Ann Plastow, PhD, MSc, BSc, PGCert, is Associate Professor and Department Head, Division of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa; nap@sun.ac.za
  • Leani Joubert, BSc, is Occupational Therapist, Inclusive Education Team, Langerug School, Worcester, South Africa
  • Yushmika Chotoo, BSc, is Community Service Occupational Therapist, Helen Joseph Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa
  • Amee Nowers, BSc, is Occupational Therapist, Private Practice, Somerset West, South Africa
  • Megan Greeff, BSc, is Occupational Therapist, Princess Christian Home, Cape Town, South Africa
  • Tinka Strydom, BSc, is Production Level Occupational Therapist, Dora Nginza Hospital, Port Elizabeth, South Africa
  • Marisca Theron, BSc, is Physical Rehabilitation Occupational Therapist, Life Riverfield Lodge, Johannesburg, South Africa
  • Emmé van Niekerk, BSc, is Clinical Educator, Division of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa, and Occupational Therapist, Sereno Clinic, Paarl, South Africa
Article Information
Mental Health / Columns: Brief Report
Brief Report   |   June 2018
The Immediate Effect of African Drumming on the Mental Well-Being of Adults With Mood Disorders: An Uncontrolled Pretest–Posttest Pilot Study
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, June 2018, Vol. 72, 7205345010p1-7205345010p6. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.021055
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, June 2018, Vol. 72, 7205345010p1-7205345010p6. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.021055
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. This pilot study is the first to examine the effects of an occupational therapist–led African drumming group on mental well-being among adult psychiatric inpatients with mood disorders.

METHOD. We used a quasi-experimental, uncontrolled, one-group, pretest–posttest design. We collected data for six different drumming groups (N = 13) using the Stellenbosch Mood Scale, the Primary Health Questionnaire–9, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder–7 scale, and the Enjoyment of Interaction Scale.

RESULTS. Participants significantly improved on all six domains of the Stellenbosch Mood Scale, with a large clinical effect. Participants with higher self-reported anxiety and depression benefited the most. According to the Enjoyment of Interaction Scale results, all the participants enjoyed the drumming “a great deal.”

CONCLUSION. Our positive findings suggest that drumming may be an effective intervention for adults with acute mood disorders. We recommend further research that uses a control intervention.