Research Article  |   August 2018
Randomized Controlled Trial to Improve Self-Efficacy in People With Multiple Sclerosis: The Community Reintegration for Socially Isolated Patients (CRISP) Program
Author Affiliations
  • J. Tamar Kalina, PhD, MSCS, OTR/L, is Medical Science Liaison, Biogen Idec, Weston, MA. At the time of the study, she was Director of Rehabilitation Services, Senior Manager Rehabilitation and Research, and Assistant Professor in Neurology, New York University, New York, NY; tamar.kalina@gmail.com
  • Jim Hinojosa, PhD, OT, FAOTA, is Professor Emeritus, New York University, New York, NY
  • Lauren Strober, PhD, is Senior Research Scientist, Kessler Foundation, West Orange, NJ
  • Joshua Bacon, PhD, is Clinical Psychologist and Assistant Professor, New York School of Medicine, New York, NY
  • Seamus Donnelly, PhD, is Student, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia
  • Yael Goverover, PhD, OTR/L, is Associate Professor, New York University, New York, NY
Article Information
Multiple Sclerosis / Neurologic Conditions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 2018
Randomized Controlled Trial to Improve Self-Efficacy in People With Multiple Sclerosis: The Community Reintegration for Socially Isolated Patients (CRISP) Program
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2018, Vol. 72, 7205205030p1-7205205030p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.026864
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2018, Vol. 72, 7205205030p1-7205205030p8. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.026864
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We examined the efficacy of a 12-wk educational socialization program, Community Reintegration for Socially Isolated Patients (CRISP), in improving self-efficacy for people with multiple sclerosis (MS). We also examined whether participants in the experimental group with increased self-efficacy experienced reduced loneliness and depression.

METHOD. This randomized controlled group design included 91 participants with MS (experimental group, n = 51; control group, n = 40). Participants were between ages 20 and 68 yr, and the majority experienced a relapsing–remitting MS course (86%) and mild to moderate disability. Participants completed baseline and posttreatment assessments, including questionnaires assessing self-efficacy, loneliness, and depression.

RESULTS. Experimental group participants significantly improved in self-efficacy compared with control group participants. Experimental group participants who demonstrated improved self-efficacy reported reduced perceptions of loneliness but not depressive symptoms.

CONCLUSION. CRISP is a promising intervention to improve self-efficacy for people with MS. However, results need to be treated with caution given the study’s limitations.