Research Article  |   August 2018
Here’s How I Write–Hebrew: Psychometric Properties and Handwriting Self-Awareness Among Schoolchildren With and Without Dysgraphia
Author Affiliations
  • Sarina Goldstand, MSc, OT, is Doctoral Candidate, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel; sgoldstand@gmail.com
  • Debbie Gevir, MSc, OT, is Occupational Therapy Supervisor and Regional Advisor for Health Professions, Ministry of Education, Jerusalem, Israel, and Instructor, Department of Continuing Education, School of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University and Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel
  • Renana Yefet, MSc, OT, is Head Occupational Therapist, Tzohar HaLev Special Education Schools, Ashdod, Israel
  • Adina Maeir, PhD, is Associate Professor and Chair, School of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University and Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel
Article Information
Assessment Development and Testing / Learning Disabilities / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / School-Based Practice / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 2018
Here’s How I Write–Hebrew: Psychometric Properties and Handwriting Self-Awareness Among Schoolchildren With and Without Dysgraphia
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2018, Vol. 72, 7205205060p1-7205205060p9. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.024869
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2018, Vol. 72, 7205205060p1-7205205060p9. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.024869
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. This study investigated the psychometric properties of the Here’s How I Write–Hebrew (HHIW–HE) and compared handwriting self-awareness between children with and without dysgraphia.

METHOD. Fifty-eight children (29 with and 29 without dysgraphia) completed the HHIW–HE. Occupational therapists provided corresponding ratings that were based on objective handwriting assessments. Self-awareness was measured through child–therapist consensus.

RESULTS. The HHIW–HE has an internal consistency of α = .884. Children with dysgraphia rated themselves as significantly more impaired than controls on 6 of 24 HHIW–HE items and on the total score, with medium to large effect sizes (0.37–0.61). Mean child–therapist agreement was significantly higher for the controls than for the research group, t(56) = 4.268, p = .000.

CONCLUSION. Results support the HHIW–HE’s validity. Children with dysgraphia reported more handwriting difficulties than did controls; however, they tended to overestimate their handwriting abilities.