Research Article  |   October 2018
Wrist Plane of Motion and Range During Daily Activities
Author Affiliations
  • Yael Kaufman-Cohen, MSc, OT, is PhD Candidate, Department of Occupational Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; e-mail: yaelkauf@post.tau.ac.il
  • Jason Friedman, PhD, is Senior Lecturer, Department of Physical Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
  • Yafa Levanon, PhD, OT, is Lecturer, Department of Occupational Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel, and Clinician, Occupational Therapy Department, Sheba Medical Center, Ramat Gan, Israel
  • Gal Jacobi is Student, Department of Occupational Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
  • Noa Doron is Student, Department of Occupational Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
  • Sigal Portnoy, PhD, is Lecturer, Department of Occupational Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
Article Information
Hand and Upper Extremity / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 2018
Wrist Plane of Motion and Range During Daily Activities
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 2018, Vol. 72, 7206205080p1-7206205080p10. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.026997
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, October 2018, Vol. 72, 7206205080p1-7206205080p10. doi:10.5014/ajot.2018.026997
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The dart-throwing motion (DTM) is a multiplane wrist motion that is needed for many daily occupations. Mobilization along the DTM plane may be essential for rehabilitation after wrist injury, but DTM angles are reported for the dominant hand alone, so their relevance to injury in the nondominant hand cannot be surmised. The aim of this study was to quantify the DTM plane angles for both hands during different activities of daily living (ADLs).

METHOD. Forty-three healthy participants wore a twin-axis electrogoniometer during ADLs.

RESULTS. No significant differences were found between the DTM plane angles of the dominant (20°–45°) and nondominant (15°–40°) hands. These angles varied by task and across participants.

CONCLUSION. The DTM plane is a functional motion used by both hands during ADLs. Because the DTM plane angle differs among hands, tasks, and individual clients, wrist rehabilitation involving the DTM plane should not be limited to a singular DTM plane angle.