Research Article  |   February 2019
Feasibility of, Adherence to, and Satisfaction With Video Game Versus Traditional Self-Training of the Upper Extremity in People With Chronic Stroke: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial
Author Affiliations
  • Anat Yacoby, MSc, OT, is Occupational Therapist. She was Master’s Student, Department of Occupational Therapy, The Stanley Steyer School of Health Professions, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel, at the time of the study.
  • Gabi Zeilig, MD, is Director, Neurological Rehabilitation Department, Chaim Sheba Medical Center at Tel-HaShomer, Tel-HaShomer, Israel, and Chair, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
  • Harold Weingarden, MD, is Senior Physician, Department of Neurological Rehabilitation, Chaim Sheba Medical Center at Tel-HaShomer, Tel-HaShomer, Israel.
  • Ronit Weiss, MSc, OT, is Occupational Therapist, Occupational Therapy Unit, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel. She was Master’s Student, Department of Occupational Therapy, The Stanley Steyer School of Health Professions, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel, at the time of the study.
  • Debbie Rand, PhD, OT, is Senior Lecturer and Chair, Department of Occupational Therapy, The Stanley Steyer School of Health Professions, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; drand@post.tau.ac.il
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Stroke / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 2019
Feasibility of, Adherence to, and Satisfaction With Video Game Versus Traditional Self-Training of the Upper Extremity in People With Chronic Stroke: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 2 2019, Vol. 73, 7301205080p1-7301205080p14. doi:10.5014/ajot.2019.026799
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 2 2019, Vol. 73, 7301205080p1-7301205080p14. doi:10.5014/ajot.2019.026799
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We compared the feasibility of, adherence to, and satisfaction with a newly developed upper extremity (UE) self-training protocol using commercial video games with a traditional self-training program for people with chronic stroke.

METHOD. Twenty-four participants with mild to moderate UE weakness were randomized to a video game (n = 13) or traditional (n = 11) self-training program. Participants were requested to train 60 min/day, 6×/wk. During the 5-wk self-training program and 4-wk follow-up, participants documented their self-training time and rated their perceived enjoyment and exertion.

RESULTS. Eleven participants completed video game training; 9 completed traditional self-training. During the follow-up period, 8 participants (72.7%) continued the video game training, and 4 (44.4%) continued traditional training. Perceived enjoyment, satisfaction, and benefit for UE improvement were relatively high.

CONCLUSIONS. Participants demonstrated high adherence to and satisfaction with both self-training programs. More participants continued to play video games after the intervention, indicating its potential to maintain ongoing activity.