Research Article
Issue Date: March 12, 2019
Published Online: March 12, 2019
Updated: March 28, 2019
Evaluation of the Reliability and Validity of the Brazilian Version of the Here’s How I Write: A Child’s Self-Assessment and Goal Setting Tool
Author Affiliations
  • Juliana Flores Mendonça Alves, MsC, is Occupational Therapist, Private Practice, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
  • Adriana M. Valladão Novais Van Petten, PhD, is Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
  • Sharon A. Cermak, PhD, OTR, is Professor, Chan Division of Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, and Professor of Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles.
  • Lívia de Castro Magalhães, PhD, OTR, is Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil; liviacmag@gmail.com
Article Information
Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / School-Based Practice / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 12, 2019
Evaluation of the Reliability and Validity of the Brazilian Version of the Here’s How I Write: A Child’s Self-Assessment and Goal Setting Tool
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 03 2019, Vol. 73, 7302205070. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2019.025387
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 03 2019, Vol. 73, 7302205070. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2019.025387
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. Our objective was to translate the Here’s How I Write: A Child’s Self-Assessment and Goal Setting Tool (HHIW) to Portuguese; adapt it to the Brazilian culture; and analyze its reliability, validity, and clinical feasibility.

METHOD. The study was developed in two steps: adaptation of the HHIW to Brazilian Portuguese, followed by experimental application to examine its validity and reliability. The participants were 60 children and their teachers, divided into two groups: Group 1, whose members had handwriting difficulties, and Group 2, whose members did not.

RESULTS. Children with poor handwriting scored lower on the HHIW for both self- and teacher report. Test–retest reliability of the children’s (.96) and teachers’ (.93) questionnaires as well as internal consistency (.91 and .95, respectively) were excellent. There was good agreement (.74) between the children’s and teachers’ total scores.

CONCLUSIONS. This study adds further evidence of validity and reliability and supports the international use of the HHIW. The HHIW is a useful resource to engage children and teachers in a collaborative relationship to improve handwriting.