Research Article
Issue Date: May 03, 2019
Published Online: May 07, 2019
Updated: May 08, 2019
Using Occupational Justice as a Linchpin of International Educational Collaborations
Author Affiliations
  • Rebecca M. Aldrich, PhD, OTR/L, is Associate Professor of Clinical Occupational Therapy, Mrs. T. H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles; rebecca.aldrich@chan.usc.edu
  • Liesl Peters, MSc(OT), is Senior Lecturer, Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
Article Information
Education of OTs and OTAs / Professional Issues / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 03, 2019
Using Occupational Justice as a Linchpin of International Educational Collaborations
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 05 2019, Vol. 73, 7303205100. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2019.029744
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 05 2019, Vol. 73, 7303205100. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2019.029744
Abstract

When designing international educational collaborations, occupational science and occupational therapy educators must consider how occupational justice can be a linchpin for students’ learning. This article describes an international collaboration involving 52 undergraduate occupational science students in the United States and 41 undergraduate occupational therapy students in South Africa. The students participated in six synchronous video conferences in 2016, during which they gave group presentations about four occupational science constructs and engaged in general question-and-answer sessions. Forty percent of the students provided feedback about the interactions using a six-item open-ended electronic questionnaire, which we analyzed using directed content analysis. Our findings suggest that the collaboration helped the students develop more nuanced understandings of disciplinary constructs, international peers, and themselves, providing a platform from which to engage with the big idea of occupational justice. Refinements to this collaboration are aimed at drawing on students’ increased critical consciousness to further develop their knowledge about occupational justice.