Research Article  |   June 2019
Effectiveness of Occupational Therapy Interventions for Adults With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Systematic Review
Author Affiliations
  • Janet L. Poole, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Director and Professor, Occupational Therapy Graduate Program, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; jpoole@salud.unm.edu
  • Joshua D. Bradford, MOT, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, Manzano del Sol, Albuquerque, NM, and La Vida Llena, Albuquerque, NM
  • Patricia Siegel, OTD, OTR/L, CHT, is Assistant Professor, Occupational Therapy Graduate Program, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
Article Information
Evidence-Based Practice / Mental Health / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 2019
Effectiveness of Occupational Therapy Interventions for Adults With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Systematic Review
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 06 2019, Vol. 73, 7304205020p1-7304205020p21. doi:10.5014/ajot.2019.030619
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 06 2019, Vol. 73, 7304205020p1-7304205020p21. doi:10.5014/ajot.2019.030619
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. Our objective was to assess the efficacy of occupational therapy–related interventions for adults with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

METHOD. We reviewed intervention studies published from 2000 to 2017. The method used for conducting the review was based on Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. The PEDro scale was used to evaluate methodological quality. Risk of bias was appraised with methods described by the Cochrane Methods Group.

RESULTS. The final analysis included 20 studies (10 physical activity and 10 psychoeducational). Moderate evidence supports physical activity to improve depression, fatigue, exercise tolerance, and function without exacerbation of disease symptoms. Strong evidence supports psychoeducational interventions using cognitive–behavioral approaches to improve pain, depression, anxiety, perceived stress, quality of life, and function. Moderate evidence supports patient education and self-management interventions for pain, depression, anxiety, perceived stress, quality of life, and function.

CONCLUSION. Further research on occupation-based interventions for people with SLE is needed.