Research Article
Issue Date: August 21, 2019
Published Online: October 08, 2019
Updated: October 08, 2019
Association of Sleep and Hand Function in People With Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Author Affiliations
  • Angela Messer Goorman, MHA, OTD, OTR/L, was Student, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, at the time of the study; goorman@comcast.net
  • Spencer Dawson, PhD, is Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Circadian and Sleep Medicine, Department of Neurology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL.
  • Colleen Schneck, ScD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Associate Dean, College of Health Sciences, and Professor, Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, College of Health Sciences, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond.
  • Doris Pierce, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Endowed Chair in Occupational Therapy, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond.
Article Information
Hand and Upper Extremity / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 21, 2019
Association of Sleep and Hand Function in People With Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2019, Vol. 73, 7306205050. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2019.034157
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2019, Vol. 73, 7306205050. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2019.034157
Abstract

This study examined whether sleep quality is associated with hand function above and beyond what can be explained by the effect of pain and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) severity on hand function in clients with CTS. The sample included 53 adults ages 30–86 yr. The Manual Ability Measure–20, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, visual analog scale for pain, and electromyography for CTS diagnosis and severity level were used to measure outcomes. Sleep quality was significantly associated with manual ability after controlling for CTS severity and pain. In CTS care, attention to sleep is significant because it may promote hand function.