Poster Session
Issue Date: August 2019
Published Online: August 01, 2019
Updated: April 30, 2020
The Psychosocial and Occupational Impact of Dog-Training Programs on Incarcerated Individuals
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA
  • Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA
Article Information
Evidence-Based Practice / Prevention and Intervention
Poster Session   |   August 01, 2019
The Psychosocial and Occupational Impact of Dog-Training Programs on Incarcerated Individuals
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2019, Vol. 73, 7311515362. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2019.73S1-PO5030
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2019, Vol. 73, 7311515362. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2019.73S1-PO5030
Abstract

Date Presented 04/05/19

Although prison dog-training programs have increased in prevalence, little research on the topic exists. We used quantitative and qualitative methods in a repeated measures design to study effects of a dog-training program in a women’s prison. We found positive effects on empathy and academic and workplace self-confidence. Further, the program fostered improved parenting attitudes. We are beginning a similar study in a male institution to compare outcomes between female and male offenders.

Primary Author and Speaker: Samantha Bauer

Additional Authors and Speakers: Regina Abel