Research Article
Issue Date: September/October 2020
Published Online: July 24, 2020
Updated: August 07, 2020
Exploring the Predictive Ability of the Motor-Free Visual Perception Test (MVPT) and Trail Making Test (TMT) for On-Road Driving Performance
Author Affiliations
  • Ana Holowaychuk, MSc, OT(C), is Occupational Therapist, Department of Occupational Therapy, Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
  • Yolan Parrott, MSc, OT(C), is Occupational Therapist, Department of Occupational Therapy, Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
  • Ada W. S. Leung, PhD, OT(C), is Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, and Neuroscience and Mental Health Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; awleung@ualberta.ca
Article Information
Community Mobility and Driving / Neurologic Conditions / Stroke / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 24, 2020
Exploring the Predictive Ability of the Motor-Free Visual Perception Test (MVPT) and Trail Making Test (TMT) for On-Road Driving Performance
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 2020, Vol. 74, 7405205070. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.119.040626
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 2020, Vol. 74, 7405205070. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.119.040626
Abstract

Importance: Resuming driving after a change in functional ability is challenging for patients with a neurological condition. Although a combination of assessment tools has been suggested for use in driving evaluation, resources and availability of tools have been a problem.

Objective: To examine the predictive ability of two commonly used tools, the Motor-Free Visual Perception Test (MVPT) and the Trail Making Test, Parts A and B (TMTA and TMTB), on on-road driving performance.

Design: Retrospective chart review of 82 patient charts between 2015 and 2016.

Setting: Local rehabilitation hospital.

Participants: Eighty-two patients with a primary neurological diagnosis (general neurological condition, n = 13; spinal cord injury, n = 11; stroke, n = 58).

Outcomes and Measures: MVPT, TMTA, and TMTB.

Results: Among the patients, 36 passed and 46 failed the on-road evaluation. The TMTA and TMTB scores were significantly different between those who passed or failed the on-road evaluation. Logistic regression analyses revealed that the TMTB completion time was the only significant predictor of on-road driving performance (for the all-patient model, 66% prediction accuracy, −2 log-likelihood [LL] = 93.47, exp β = 0.98; for the stroke-only model, 76% prediction accuracy, −2LL = 59.61, exp β = 0.97).

Conclusions and Relevance: Our findings suggest that the TMTB is a better predictor of on-road driving performance for patients with a neurological condition than the MVPT. The findings shed light on the importance of selecting proper tools when assessing driving performance. Future prospective studies with a wider array of predictive variables are recommended to support the present findings.

What This Article Adds: Occupational therapists should revisit the use of the MVPT in driving assessment and consider multiple assessment tools when evaluating and predicting driving performance.