Poster Session
Issue Date: August 2020
Published Online: August 01, 2020
Updated: September 09, 2020
Intentional Emotional Face Production in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder Is Related to Social Functioning but Not Affect Recognition
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • USC Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Los Angeles, CA, USA
  • University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA, USC Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Los Angeles, CA, USA
  • University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA, USC Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Los Angeles, CA, USA
  • USC Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Los Angeles, CA, USA, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
  • USC Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Los Angeles, CA, USA, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
  • University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA, USC Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Los Angeles, CA, USA
  • USC Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Los Angeles, CA, USA, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
  • University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA, USC Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Article Information
Autism/Autism Spectrum Disorder / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Basic Research
Poster Session   |   August 01, 2020
Intentional Emotional Face Production in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder Is Related to Social Functioning but Not Affect Recognition
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2020, Vol. 74, 7411505199. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2020.74S1-PO7207
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2020, Vol. 74, 7411505199. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2020.74S1-PO7207
Abstract

Date Presented 03/28/20

The results of this study indicate the need to develop interventions targeting EFP abilities for ASD. Children with ASD showed decreased valence, but not accuracy, of their positive-valence facial expressions. In ASD, there was a negative correlation between EFP accuracy and ASD symptoms related to social functioning. There were no relationships found between affect recognition accuracy and EFP accuracy.

Primary Author and Speaker: Sharada Krishnan

Additional Authors and Speakers: Emily Kilroy

Contributing Authors: Christiana Butera, Laura Harrison, Aditya Jayashankar, Anusha Hossain, Alexis Nalbach, Lisa Aziz-Zadeh