Poster Session
Issue Date: August 2020
Published Online: August 01, 2020
Updated: July 29, 2020
Visual Biases and Attentional Inflexibilities Differentiate Those at Elevated Likelihood of Autism: An Eye-Tracking Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
  • USC Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Los Angeles, CA, USA
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
Article Information
Autism/Autism Spectrum Disorder / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Basic Research
Poster Session   |   August 01, 2020
Visual Biases and Attentional Inflexibilities Differentiate Those at Elevated Likelihood of Autism: An Eye-Tracking Study
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2020, Vol. 74, 7411505200. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2020.74S1-PO8133
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, August 2020, Vol. 74, 7411505200. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2020.74S1-PO8133
Abstract

Date Presented 03/28/20

This study examined attentional inflexibility for children at elevated likelihood (EL) for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) through use of eye tracking. The results indicate that the EL-ASD group had significantly fewer attention shifts from an area of interest to the rest of the screen. While we only assessed a static activity, we believe attentional inflexibilities are also present during occupational engagement, which has implications for OT practice. OT strategies to address this will also be discussed.

Primary Author and Speaker: Stephanie Bristol

Additional Authors and Speakers: Susan Agostine

Contributing Authors: Aaron Dallman, Clare Harrop, Elizabeth Crais, Grace Baranek, Linda Watson